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A Voice for Men’s post on feminism destroying humanity is not only daft; it’s plagiarised

Eyes on your own paper, Mr. Bean!
Eyes on your own paper, Mr. Bean!

UPDATE: The plagiarised posts on AVFM have been taken down without explanation or apology; see my post here for more details and perhaps a little schadenfreude. 

UPDATE 2: Elam has belatedly posted an acknowledgement of (some of) the plagiarism. Then he called me fat. See my take here.

You may remember Amartya Talukdar, the marital rape legalization advocate and Holocaust denier who is also a regular contributor to A Voice for Men.

Yesterday, he graced us all with a post on AVFM featuring the ominous title Feminism and Destruction of Humanity.

Not “Feminism and the Destruction of Humanity,” mind you, but “Feminism and Destruction of Humanity.” His previous post for AVFM was titled “Why Capitalists Are Playing Footsie With Feminist.” Not “With Feminists,” or “With Feminism” but “With Feminist.”

AVFM has 19 people on its masthead. It has a “managing editor,” an “assistant managing editor,” and a just plain “editor.” It has three other ostensible “editors” and three more people who are “news directors” of various sorts.

Apparently none of these people — nor anyone else on AVFM’s “staff” — bothers to read posts or their headlines before they go up on the site.

The post is full of sentences that are appalling both in what they say and in how they are written.

Here are some of my favorites:

Feminism not only ascendance in the western world but was exported to other countries through the UN, CEDAW and massive funding.

The Feminist also abhor religion and promote lesbian subculture. 

It’s obvious that high divorce rates, lower birth rates and gay subcultures were instrumental in downfall of Rome. It will similarly lead to downfall of modern human civilization under the grip of Feminism.

Thing is, only portions of Talukdar’s post are grammatically disastrous. The first half is a competently written, if rather dull, discussion of Malthusianism and its supposed implications for the contemporary world. Other sections, while sort of loopy in their arguments, are also more or less grammatically correct.

Suspicious, I cut and pasted Talukdar’s post into an online plagiarism checker and, well, let’s just say that the results were about as shocking as an M Night Shyamalan “twist ending.”

Most of the post is plagiarised word-for-word from an assortment of texts easily found online.

In most cases, Talukdar didn’t even bother to alter the wording even a little bit; he basically cut and pasted various passages together from these sources, added a few misshapen sentences of his own, and put his name at the top.

Here’s the opening of Talukdar’s post:

Thomas Malthus (1766-1834) postulated in his Essay on the Principles of Population (1798), that food production, limited by the land available, can only grow at an arithmetic rate (1,2,3,4,5…), while population growth tends to grow at a geometric rate (2,4,8,16,32…). 

Here’s the original passage, from some lecture notes someone put online:

Malthus postulated in his Essay on the Principles of Population (1798), that food production, limited by the land available, can only grow at an arithmetic rate (1,2,3,4,5…), while population growth tends to grow at a geometric rate (2,4,8,16,32…).

The only change Talukdar made was to add Malthus’ first name and the dates of his birth and death.

Talukdar’s post continues:

These trends, he argued, would result in a point at which a society experiences war, poverty, and famine as the need for food surpasses its availability.

That sentence came, literally word for word, from a page on Neo-Malthusian Theory put online to supplement a college course.

These trends, he argued, would result in a point at which a society experiences war, poverty, and famine as the need for food surpasses its availability.

Talukdar then moved on from Malthus to The Population Bomb:

The Population Bomb was written by Stanford University Professor Paul R. Ehrlich in 1968. It warned of the mass starvation of humans in the 1970s and 1980s due to overpopulation, as well as other major societal upheavals, and advocated immediate action to limit population growth.

Ta da! He got all that from Wikipedia.

The Population Bomb is a best-selling book written by Stanford University Professor Paul R. Ehrlich and his wife, Anne Ehrlich (who was uncredited), in 1968.[1][2] It warned of the mass starvation of humans in the 1970s and 1980s due to overpopulation, as well as other major societal upheavals, and advocated immediate action to limit population growth.

I think you’ve got the idea here.

Other cut-and-pasted sources for “Talukdar’s” post include pieces in The Economist and Forbes; a somewhat loopy post about Feminism and the Destruction of the Nuclear Family on  on a site called The Radical Conservative; an op-ed on an Indian site called The Daily O, which itself seems to have been partly plagiarised from an article from The Weekly Standard that someone posted on FreeRepublic; something called the Palmetto Family Council; and an article on the fall of Rome on a site run by the United Church of God.

Even Talukdar’s sentence blaming the fall of Rome on “high divorce rates, lower birth rates and gay subcultures” turns out to have been half-plagiarised.

And there may be more; I used the free version of the plagiarism checker, which doesn’t check each and every sentence.

The obvious next question is: What about his earlier articles?

Well, I ran “Why Capitalists Are Playing Footsie With Feminist” through the plagiarism checker as well, and, yep, it’s heavily plagiarised too. 

Sources for that Talukdar (Not-so) Original include: Wikipedia; Wikipedia; a post on Quora that seems to have been “borrowed” from an old version of a Wikipedia article; a giant chunk of the same Daily O article he also plagiarised in “Feminism and Destruction of Humanity”; Europa.eu; the Green Global Foundation Journal; Foreign Affairs; and (somewhat ironically) a piece by socialist feminist theorist Nancy Fraser in The Guardian.

I’m not going to bother to check any of his others.

So the question now is whether this evidence of massive and obvious plagiarism lead AVFM to finally show Talukdar the door?

I honestly don’t know. After all, they kept publishing him after I presented them with clear evidence he was a Holocaust denier, so what’s a little plagiarism between friends?

By the way, here’s the Mr. Bean skit I got the screenshot above from:

 

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Orion
Orion
6 years ago

I was under the impression that “the fall of Rome” might be better understood as “the change of management in Rome.” As discussed in this thread, Rome (the city and the imperial palace) was taken by force several times by ethnically-Roman generals, who took over rather than destroying the institutions of Roman governance, such as they were. I was under the impression the several of the Germanic conquests worked the same way, with Ostrogoth leaders saying “I’m now in charge of your taxmen, road-builders, and bean-counters” rather than “I’m killing your bureaucrats, abolishing your laws, and running Rome as Germanic territory.”

Kat
Kat
6 years ago

@mockingbird
I won’t be able to read all the comments right now, but I want to wish you all the luck in the world.

And to point out that you are a beloved, not to mention active, poster.

guy
guy
6 years ago

We generally date the official fall of Rome to the removal of the last Emperor ruling from Rome. The city was repeatedly sacked by invaders before that. By the time the last Emperor was removed the western government had essentially ceased to exist in a recognizable form, and no invader could realistically claim to be Emperor of the West. Realistically, even if someone resident in Rome had continued claiming the title for the next several centuries it wouldn’t have changed the course of events much. The 5th century Empire was not the same as the 1st century one; 476 AD is simply a milestone date rather than a turning point.

I’m honestly mostly familiar with the late Empire as background to studying medieval history or an epilogue to studying late Republic/early Imperial, so I’m not sure how much instantaneous impact various phases had on the population at large, but by the time of Charlemagne the old institutions were pretty well toast in the West.

bluecat
bluecat
6 years ago

@ mockingbird

Thinking of you and wishing you all the best in the world.

And seconding what Orion said above.

Bina
Bina
6 years ago

Capitalists are playing footsie with “feminist”? Which feminist, pray tell? Not me, that’s for sure — I’m an ardent ANTIcapitalist. And my bank account wouldn’t knock anyone’s eye out unless they had awfully poor eyesight to begin with.

I’m gonna go right ahead and say that clear thinking, spelling, grammar, syntax, and proofreading are all obviously feminist, because AVFMorons seems to be totally against all that.

Alan Robertshaw
6 years ago

I hope, as we’re discussing Rome, I can be forgiven for posting this.

It does reference the Roman constitution and the transition from republic to imperium and the roots of the military being decisive in how Rome was ruled.

I also think it’s the best 5 minutes of television ever produced.

http://youtu.be/FQe28wNe6SU

Myoo
Myoo
6 years ago

@ mockingbird
Good luck. I hope it’s nothing serious.

numerobis
numerobis
6 years ago

Bernardo Soares: Total War: Barbarian Invasions is an add-on to TW:R the original (i.e. ancient, i.e. cheap) which lets you play around the turn of the 5th century. As the western empire you basically have to accept immediately losing several provinces to rebellion, you’ll have no cash to replenish your troops after battles unless you cut costs aggressively, you will have trouble with germanic tribes attacking Gaul. If you leave your eastern border too lightly defended, the eastern empire might grab that land (as they historically did). If/when you get all that under control, that’s when the big population movements reach you, each nomadic tribe being driven away by another into your territories. A very nice challenge overall.

Kat
Kat
6 years ago

@dhag85

Thanks for the kickass photos! I could see only one penguin photo (in the water), but I’ll try looking again tomorrow. Sometimes the photos don’t materialize for me. Your dad’s cat materialized and then disappeared. Did that cat have some fur missing on its forehead? (Or maybe, like Buttercup Q. Skullpants, a cupcake on its forehead? Not that there’s anything wrong with that.)

I did see all the photos of your cats, who are very adorbs. And quirky.

And I find these sentences intriguing:

I had a predictably emotional response to being close to animals. :p Dunno what’s wrong with me, but I had a moment where I had to tell myself “okay, I can’t let anyone see me crying because of how pretty this wolf fish is, get it together!”

This is poetry.

Kat
Kat
6 years ago

@dhag85
Ooh, now I see all your photos except the one above the penguins in the water. So worth waiting for!

And huskies tomorrow! Maybe some photos of them are to come.

Say hello to your wife.

Kat
Kat
6 years ago

@Rabid Rabbit

WHORES! Whores whores whores whores whores whores WHORES!!!

More poetry.

You made me laugh.

Compared with your writing, Dean Esmay’s is subtle, understated, reserved.

GardenGallivant
GardenGallivant
6 years ago

Mockingbird, you have my hopes that this is a minor problem soon rectified. However, if cancer, it is possible to treat an ovarian or uterine cancer with a simple hysterectomy and/or oophorectomy (ovary removal surgery) I was told. It depends on the type of cell the cancer arose from, its stage (how much it has grown) and grade (how metastatic it can be).

I empathize with your fears as it has been just over a year since my uterine cancer surgery last Dec. They were able to tell me that I had a carcinosarcoma, a grade III cancer of both epithelial and connective tissues, two days after my biopsy but I had to wait two weeks for the CAT scan to find out if it was obviously metastatic yet. During this period I knew the overall survival rate was 40% for five years.

So when I went to my oncologist I asked her for papers on the cancer because I am a molecular biologist. I read everything she sent and joined a group online that shares concerns and current research on this rare and fast growing form of cancer that is highly metastatic.

Like you I was wavering between hope and fatalistic visions of the impact on my family.

After my surgery they found I was lucky to be a stage IA, meaning the tumor had penetrated the muscle wall but not emerged from the uterus. The washings, ovaries and lymph nodes were all clear. I could have stopped treatment then with 70% chance of survival but I opted to go for both chemo and radiation to give me a 90% chance. But I did this only because this cancer is so aggressive, other types that are less aggressive than sarcomas can be treated with just surgery.

If you want to talk more to someone who has just gone through this please email me at nmfnelson@gmail.com

EJ (The Other One)
EJ (The Other One)
6 years ago

I’m told that Total War: Attila is a good game but pays only lip service to any sense of playing like a history game. Creative Assembly know who their fanbase are, and it isn’t the historical-plausibility grognards.

Three Snakes
6 years ago

The reasons for the Western Empire’s collapse will always be up for debate, but I think we can safely dispense with Roman moral decadence or Germanic racial superiority.

I saw a documentary series, The Roman Empire. A historian (Tacitus maybe), horrified at the corruption of the times, looked back to the past hoping to find a time of virtue. Instead he discovered early Rome was just as barbaric as the Rome he was in.

Alan Robertshaw
6 years ago

@ three snakes

Wasn’t the major dispute between Livy and Ovid over whether historians should write about all the noble things in the past to inspire contemporary people to better behaviour, or just report the horrid truth that even in the past Romans were wankers?

dhag85
dhag85
6 years ago

@Kat

No missing fur! Just weird coloring. 🙂

Huskies are not until Sunday. I will definitely take pictures!

Lady Mondegreen
6 years ago

@nparker

It still mocks a dead child

In no way is it mocking the child.

Satire that acknowledges real life horror is not to blame for the horror it puts before us.

nparker
nparker
6 years ago

In no way is it mocking the child.

Whatever you say.

Satire that acknowledges real life horror is not to blame for the horror it puts before us.

Please refer to my reply to Ohlmann (or actually, the majority of this discussion)

Jessi
Jessi
6 years ago

So wait, the first half of the article talks about imminent mass starvation due to population outpacing infrastructure, but feminism is destroying humanity by lowering the birth rate and averting at least one of the looming crises threatening civilization? That’s a bad thing?

painteyelash
painteyelash
6 years ago

Hey David, I was thinking..Did you notice the homophobic part of Talukdar’s post? He blamed “homosexual behaviour” and “gay subcultures” for the so-called downfall. Uh..Is AVFM not claiming to speak on behalf of gay men? Whilst supporting a guy that clearly sees homosexuality as a bad and destructive thing.

Also, the info box in the article says he is a humanist. Haha.

Thank you for adding the archived copy!

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