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The Worst Twitter Conversation in History (This Week)?

My feelings exactly
My feelings exactly

Well, ok, it’s probably not literally the worst Twitter conversation ever — you’ve seen Twitter, right? — but you have to admit it’s pretty awful all around.

In one corner, we have @apurposefulwife, “alt right” racist and defender of “Traditional Family Life and White Culture.”

In the other, manosphere clown @aaron_clarey, a dude who proudly identifies himself as an “asshole.”

Let’s get ready to rumble:

Wife With A Purpose ‏@apurposefulwife European women deserve protection from violent, raping Arabs who see them as subhuman #SaveEurope from #rapefugees Aaron Clarey ‏@aaron_clarey · Jan 7 @apurposefulwife No they don't. They vote left and pro-multiculturalism all the time and spit in their men's faces. They deserve it.

I hereby declare both combatants in this ideological battle huge losers.

The screenshot isn’t mine; I ran across it on Twitter, but unfortunately lost track of who originally posted it. Nonetheless, the tweets are real, and you can find the full discussion between @apurposefulwife and Mr. Clarey archived here.

Here are a few other recent Tweets from both of them. Such charmers!

https://twitter.com/apurposefulwife/status/688567891273199616

https://twitter.com/apurposefulwife/status/687298001920917505

https://twitter.com/apurposefulwife/status/686678320109387776

https://twitter.com/aaron_clarey/status/684856576419627008

https://twitter.com/aaron_clarey/status/686295836897210368

https://twitter.com/aaron_clarey/status/672849385722478593

https://twitter.com/aaron_clarey/status/686572810114850816

That last one is a warning to anyone tempted to buy one of his ebooks, not that anyone here will be.

 

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Alan Robertshaw
Alan Robertshaw
6 years ago

@ anisky

Come to think of it, I should have used “sometimes” instead of “can”.

As it stands, there’s an implication that pandas have permission to eat both but some pandas refuse to do so!

Daft as it sounds, this is the sort of thing we have to worry about when drafting.

Kat
Kat
6 years ago

@EJ (The Other One)

I’m in favour of reeducation gulags, but that’s probably just me.

You’re not alone. I’m all for it. Finally, some sober, sensible advice on WHTM!

And don’t get me started on the “expire by” dates! There is no consistency in terms of font, size, placement on the package, or wording. Also, have you ever tried to read pale-yellow numbers on a jar of coconut butter? A store clerk explained to me recently that the use of “expire by” dates is voluntary. Outrageous! I’d love to take it up with my do-nothing Congress!

Better yet, I’ll send the CEOs of all the food companies, along with all the Republicans, to reeducation gulags.

Orion
Orion
6 years ago

@Kat,

they’re voluntary because they have nothing to do with food safety. I’m pretty sure the FDA *does* publish health guidelines for food storage which you can look up online. If not them, various researchers have.

The expiration dates put on by manufacturers are there to make sure you don’t complain if the food is a little dryer or soggier than you’d like, and to get you to throw out perfectly good food and buy more.

Alan Robertshaw
Alan Robertshaw
6 years ago

@ Kat & Orion

A while back someone found a store of WW1 “Bully Beef” (a form of tinned meat used by troops). It was found to be perfectly safe to eat. Well, from a storage point of view; they used lead based solder on the tins at the time; but that’s a different issue.

Kat
Kat
6 years ago

@Orion

I’m pretty sure the FDA *does* publish health guidelines for food storage which you can look up online. If not them, various researchers have.

But if you don’t know when it’s been packaged, then you don’t know how long it will keep. That’s why I rely on those use-by dates. At least I have some sense of the time involved.

@Alan Robertshaw
Bully beef! Sounds tasty. And British.

EJ (The Other One)
EJ (The Other One)
6 years ago

Yay, best-before dates, a topic I know and love well. Here’s some stuff I learned in the logistics industry.

As well as sell-by dates (called “best before” or “use by” in places where customers like to be respected) most products also have depot-by and store-by dates. It’s part of running a good logistics pipeline, and the benefit to the customer is a pleasant side effect. As such, for a lot of goods that are sold as loose singles or in sub-packages, those dates would be printed on the shipping case and so you won’t see them.

In the industry, this is known as “code life”: something that’s approaching the end of this period is said to be “short coded”, and when it’s past it’s said to be “past code.” The art of grocery logistics involves getting goods into the depot, then into store, then into the customer’s fridge before code life expires.

Normally things will be good for a while after they’re past code. The code life is chosen bearing in mind that it’s likely to sit in the customer’s fridge for a little while before being eaten, after all.

From a logistical point of view, “spoiled goods” are usually mostly still fine: out of a hundred cans of baked beans on a pallet, ninety-nine will probably be fine even when they’re condemned as spoiled. The issue is that nobody knows which can is bad without opening them, which turns shopping into a game of Russian Roulette and leads to delicious, delicious lawsuits. Most companies would rather throw good food away than be sued for selling bad food, so they set the code life to compensate for this.

Moral of the story: even if it’s past code you can probably eat it. People throw out too much food nowadays.

isidore13
isidore13
6 years ago

TMI but one bout with explosive vomiting from food poisoning and you get pretty obsessive about not eating bad food.

mildlymagnificent
mildlymagnificent
6 years ago

_Use By_ is the really important food advice on containers and packets. Really. Important.

Milk and other dairy, meat, bread and other fresh foods really do go off in fairly short order unless you freeze, cook or otherwise treat them to prevent it.

On the other hand, Sell by or Best Before dates are about items which will not be dangerous if consumed beyond the stipulated date, but there is no guarantee of quality if you do. Leave a frozen, dried, bottled, pickled or canned item too long and it’s your own fault if it’s got freezer burn or weevils have got into the pasta, flour, raisins or packet cake mix or nuts have gone rancid or your flavoured vinegar has gone cloudy or any other calamity that can befall food stored too long or in the wrong conditions.

Though I confess that I’ve managed to eat lettuce over a year old that was in one of those unbelievably good Tupperware containers explicitly for lettuce. I’ve also discovered the use by date “too late” after eating perfectly good yogurt. I tend to look first at refrigerated items and check the use by date only if it looks or smells a bit suss.

mildlymagnificent
mildlymagnificent
6 years ago

As for the other question about dates, I read a really good explanation some time ago about how and why the US diverged from the rest of the English speaking world on dates. I’m not certain about Europe when it comes to this little corner of social history.

I may be the only person here old enough to remember this stuff, but I _do_ remember using the very old convention*. Dates were written with the DD in ordinary numerals, but the month was written in Roman numerals, and the year was once again in ordinary numerals.

Using this rule, it didn’t make any difference which order the month and day were written in because the Roman numerals distinguished the month clearly from both the day and the year. I doubt I ever wrote a date with the month first, but I’ve certainly read things with the month in Roman numerals first and it didn’t worry me at all. (Possibly legal documents prepared in the 40s or 50s when I was dealing with deceased estates in the early 70s?)

The problem only arose when everyone shifted to ordinary numerals for every element of the date. The US stuck with month first. Everyone else went with day first.

*(Probably when I was still writing with a nib pen dipped in an inkwell. I kid you not. Even fountain pens were frowned on before year 8. From year 8 onwards, 1960 in my case, ballpoints were excoriated as lazy writing and absolutely banned from school. Fountain pens were now compulsory.)

Freemage
Freemage
6 years ago

Nequam: I’ve owned a copy of The Deluxe Transitive Vampire for a decade-ish. I’ve used it for several games of Eat Poop, You Cat on various forums. (EPYC is a forum game where you have two groups of equal size–artists and writers–and a moderator. The game starts with the moderator sending a sentence via the website’s PM to the first artist, who then illustrates it (either treating it as a caption, or something someone in the picture is saying), sending the picture to the moderator. This picture is then sent to the second writer, who sends back a sentence describing or captioning it. The game continues until everyone has gone once. Then the moderator posts the entire chain to a forum thread, with attribution. It’s like a game of telephone, but with illustrations. The sample sentences from TDTV were always wonderfully evocative starting points for the game.)

Alan: I must admit, I’ve come to my own personal theory that Gaelic is actually just a prank the various non-English parts of the UK decided to play on the English. “Okay, so, we stick a bunch of ‘w’s, ‘b’s, ‘d’s and ‘n’s, run them all together with a ‘y’ at the front. Then we tell ’em it’s pronounced ‘Fred’.”

Alan Robertshaw
Alan Robertshaw
6 years ago

@ Freemage

Ha, yeah, I’ve got an Aunty Mebd and a cousin Siobhan so I can well believe that!

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