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Misogyny Theater: Roosh vs. the Lady MRAs

In this edition of Misogyny Theater, we hear from pickup guru Roosh V, who has some thoughts about the female Men’s Rights Activists – FeMRAs – that we’ve seen so much of in the media of late.

He doesn’t much like them. Not because they’re hateful nitwits like their male comrades in the Men’s Rights movement. But because, you know, they’re women, representatives of what Roosh so memorably calls “a gender who has no loyalty to men.”

He accuses them of pandering to men for attention, and accuses male MRAs, in turn, of being too easily ensnared by their feminine wiles. It’s a mirror image of the accusations that MRAs like to throw at male feminists, and likely to infuriate more than a few MRAs, both male and female.

All of Roosh’s bits in this video come from his recent video “The Men’s Rights Movement Is Making A Huge Mistake.” I’ve indicated all my edits with beeps.

We may be seeing more from Roosh in Misogyny Theater in the future. For the dating-guru-cum-reactionary philosopher, from his secret lair located somewhere in Siberia – no, really, he has literally exiled himself to Siberia — has announced in another video his plans to take over YouTube over the course of the next year or so.

Will he be able to do it? On the one hand, he’s a reactionary woman-hating piece of shit, which means that he should be able to appeal to YouTube’s vast reactionary woman-hating piece of shit demographic. And he has managed to build up his Return of Kings blog into a must-read site for terrible people; a quick check with web traffic monitor Alexa shows that, trafficwise, ROK is trouncing the most popular Men’s Rights site, A Voice for Men.

On the other, as you may have gathered from this video, he has about as much charisma as a sack of potatoes. Stay tuned.

 

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cassandrakitty
cassandrakitty
7 years ago

He must be such a joy at social events. I wonder if he talks about Elam in meatspace too.

LBT
LBT
7 years ago

Oh Woody. Keep on keeping on, little trucker.

strivingally
7 years ago

The dumb thing is he could easily clock up 5 comments if he stopped focusing on how outraged he was.

This thread: “sporkle. Yeah, Roosh is a dick.” He’d be 20% of the way there already!

But no. Can’t even post something trivially relevant without waving his pom-poms for Peelam, huh?

pallygirl
pallygirl
7 years ago

Pom-poms, is that the medical term for them? 😛

alternatesteve90
7 years ago

Okay, well, so this may not be totally relevant to the Roosh V problem, but it does have to do with MRAs, or rather, trolling, by same, so here goes. An alternate history site I frequented was just slammed by a troll who thought it’d be cool to just spring his shit on people:

http://alternatehistory.com/discussion/showthread.php?p=9493546

Now, thankfully, the admin had the good sense to ban this ass-backwards person, but still……”Forced incels?”. Who in the f*** has ever forced men not to have (consensual) sex? *facepalm*.

Robert
Robert
7 years ago

Sparky – yes! That was the first work of hers I read. Deep time, indeed. Part of what I like about her writing (at least what I’ve read) is that the mysteries stay mysterious. Lovecraft, for all his multitudinous faults as a writer (and a human being), understood that. Stross, despite being a much better writer, shines a brighter light on his horrors. It’s fun to read, but it is not Lovecraftian to me. Bob Howard (the Laundry protagonist) would have been dead or insane by the end of the first book otherwise.

Shut up, Woody.

sparky
sparky
7 years ago

Robert:

Part of what I like about her writing (at least what I’ve read) is that the mysteries stay mysterious. Lovecraft, for all his multitudinous faults as a writer (and a human being), understood that

Yep! That’s what makes things scary, and that’s the problem with horror, too. It’s difficult to maintain that kind of “reveal-just-enough-but-not-too-much” tension going, especially through the length of a novel. It seems like the length of a short story is better suited to it. Or, at least, there are more short horror stories that have genuinely frightened me, rather than novels. And when I find a genuinely frightening horror novel, I treasure it.

I like Lovecraft in small doses. One story at a time. Reading him is like eating triple fudge cake, good in small slivers but too much is just way too rich.

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