Categories
announcements antifeminism evil sex-having women misogyny MRA reddit

We’re back, with three profound insights into the true nature of women from the Men’s Rights subreddit

Hey, We Hunted the Mammoth is up again

As you might have noticed, this site has not been on its best behavior lately; there have been slowdowns, 504 errors, outages. Well, with the help of am internet maven who was very generous with her time and expertise, we’re now back on track. And on a shiny new server. So hopefully things will be running a bit more smoothly from here on out, though there may be a few glitches as we settle in on the new server. There are a few formatting things i need to fix as well.

But dammit, we’re back.

And I’d like to celebrate by sharing with you three unique insights into the true nature of women and feminism that I found on everyone’s favorite hate site, the Men’s Rights subreddit. Take it away, boys.

That’s the whole post. It got upvotes.

I didn’t realize that “working at a gas station” was part of the feminist stereotype.

It gets weirder.

redditlovesgenocide 1 point 16 days ago 
The most beautiful female I have ever seen agreed to a threesome with a man because he walked up to her at the festival and told her "I have a large penis" she agreed having seen it then agreed to a threesome with him. I knew stuff like this would happen with liberated female sexuality when I was 6 years old, Ive also known plenty fof male virgins close to 30 years old.

You knew that a beautiful woman would say “yes” to a threesome with a big-dicked man at a festival … when you were 6 years old?

I’m pretty sure most 6-year-olds don’t even know what a threesome is. Or what “liberated female sexuality” consists of.

Sweet_Shirt 3 points 1 day ago 
That's how you know you're doing it right... when you start making feminazis cry.

What if they’re crying from laughing so hard at you?

Follow me on Twitter.

Send tips to dfutrelle at gmail dot com.

We Hunted the Mammoth relies entirely on readers like you for its survival. If you appreciate our work, please send a few bucks our way! Thanks!

.

Subscribe
Notify of
guest

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

33 Comments
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments
Surplus to Requirements
Surplus to Requirements
3 months ago

@Moggie:

I dislike seeing people reduced to their jobs. If you ever feel like looking down on someone for working at a gas station, because apparently providing you with an essential service isn’t enough to earn your respect, just remind yourself that they may achieve admirable things when they’re not at their job.

Hear, hear! I especially hate all the right wing arguments that they don’t deserve a livable wage because “they should go to school and get a better job” (and if everyone did that, who’d stock the shelves and plow the roads and build the freaking office complexes and fix your fridge when it broke down?) and “the market is paying them what they’re worth”.

If someone is being paid to do some labor somewhere, then society, or some person at least, has deemed that task important enough to spend money on. And that means that that someone is contributing something useful.

In addition to that, a person is more than just their job. Reducing someone to a job is saying that a non-billionaire’s value is limited to the extent to which they can make some billionaire even richer, and this is just as objectifying in its own way as saying that a woman’s value is limited to the extent to which she can satisfy some man’s urge for sex, or for sammitches, or for house-cleaning services. It’s the class-instead-of-gender version of the same old hierarchical oppression: some people are important, and the rest are only valuable insofar as their labors or what-have-you accrue to the benefit of the important people.

Would that we had a world where the very concept of a “VIP” would just prompt baffled looks and general confusion.

@bumblebug:

I also think that not everyone needs to accomplish something “big”. Maybe someone’s big goal in life is to enjoy their day to day existence. And that’s great and not worth less than someone who wants to make huge contributions to humanity.

With 8 billion people, it simply isn’t feasible for everyone to accomplish something big. Unfortunately our current system throws everyone into competition with everyone else, with the result being “go big or go home”: unless you produce a smash hit or otherwise make it into the global “celebrity” class, you get virtually no attention at all; if you do, then you get so much attention there’s no escape from it, as Meghan and Harry found out to their chagrin when even moving halfway across the world and trying to live a quiet life didn’t stop the constant nattering of the talking heads and so forth.

There needs to be some sort of “relocalization” here, I think, where someone of decent talent can get attention locally; being the best in the city or even the neighborhood sufficing, rather than having to be in the top 10 or so on the entire fucking planet to get noticed at all. This applies to all kinds of sports, entertainment, and other things that involve trading talented actions of some kind for attention (and, in the present system, then monetizing that attention so as to be able to prove to the system one’s right to continue to eat, have shelter, and devote time and attention to that area of talent instead of losing all of one’s waking hours to burger flipping or other menial work — which isn’t to devalue such work, but perhaps it should be spread more thinly, paid better, and not be something large sections of the population get forced into when they’d rather do other things).

Alan Robertshaw
3 months ago

@ surplus

the same old hierarchical oppression: some people are important, and the rest are only valuable insofar as their labors or what-have-you accrue to the benefit of the important people.

You make a good point; as did Bumblebug originally.

I would of course though say that how we treat animals is a major part of how we normalise such thinking and attitudes.

From birth, we condition children into accepting certain premises:

Some lives are just more valuable than others.
Suffering and cruelty is just an inevitable and necessary part of life.
The strong and powerful have a natural right to exploit the weak and powerless.
Etc etc.

There’s a thing called “name the trait” that is worth reading up on. But I would put it like this:

Name one justification for our treatment of animals that can’t be, and indeed hasn’t been, used to justify the treatment of at least some humans.

I do just come from an animal rights perspective; but I can see why many people think we need to save the animals if we are to save ourselves.

kupo
kupo
3 months ago

@Contrapangloss
You’re welcome! Sorry I’m not around much, everything is just Too Much these days and I need to be in the right frame of mind to wade through even a mocking summary of the worst people the internet has to offer.

Queen of the Harpies
Queen of the Harpies
3 months ago

@kupo

everything is just Too Much these days and I need to be in the right frame of mind to wade through even a mocking summary of the worst people the internet has to offer

I feel that.

“I should check WHTM today. … Ugh, do I really want to slog through a bunch of entitled man-babies whining about their hate-boners…?”

moregeekthan
moregeekthan
3 months ago

Just in case anyone finds this information useful: There are many websites that react poorly when reloaded multiple times in a row. This would appear to be one of them. The standard workaround in such cases, if one really feels the need to make sure that they are viewing the most current version of the site, is to go all the way out of the site, then back in.

Lumipuna
Lumipuna
3 months ago

moregeekthan: “Have you tried killing and resurrecting your mammoth?”

Queen of the Harpies
Queen of the Harpies
3 months ago

@Lumipuna

You fool! That’s how the zombie mammoth hordes will get us!!

Gerald Fnord
Gerald Fnord
3 months ago

An intellectual bankruptcy ‘tell’: an obsession with seeing people on the other side cry. People with worthy ideas don’t want their opponents to be sad, they want them to come over to their side, maybe a little chagrined at their mistakes of the past….

33
0
Would love your thoughts, please comment.x
()
x
%d bloggers like this: