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men who should not ever be with women ever MGTOW misogyny reddit

MGTOWs have curiously strong feelings about Jim and Pam from The Office

By David Futrelle

So-called Men Going Their Own Way are having trouble getting over the long-running soap opera of Jim and Pam from The Office, a show that ceased production more than six years ago.

Not that they’re fans of either character. In the last few months, MGTOW Redditors have twice posted the same screencap from 4chan calling Pam a bitch; last year one MGTOW typed out a ten-point statement that he thought proved Jim was “the biggest Simp in Fiction.”

Their feelings about these two fictional characters and their imaginary sex lives seem, well, curiously strong. Take this exchange, found in yet another Jim/Pam thread in the MGTOW subreddit.

AhIndeed 10 points 1 month ago 
Jim is a huge beta male that played friend while she got railed by the more dominant Roy. Pam is a typical broad that got the best of both worlds-her abusive ex she gets to leave and look all heroic even though she prob loved the sex and then she gets her knight in shining armour.

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[–]Mylesfakeaccount[S] 4 points 1 month ago 
Yes so she will probably find another alpha type

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[–]AhIndeed 7 points 1 month ago 
She might cheat on Jim with another roy type down the line, but she secured her beta male provider

These guys seem to have spent quite a lot of time thinking about “roy types” having sex with — sorry, “railing” — Pam. I’m not quite sure which character they’re even jealous of in this scenario.

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Lumipuna (nee Arctic Ape)
Lumipuna (nee Arctic Ape)
2 years ago

Zoomer: I like Star Wars.

Millennial: Disney and wokeness have ruined Star Wars.

Xer: Original trilogy only, please.

Boomer: Back in my day, we watched real people walking on another planet.

Naglfar
Naglfar
2 years ago

@Lumipuna
What is a Zoomer? I haven’t heard the word used in that way before.

Katamount
Katamount
2 years ago

Umm… people often talk about their favorite media long past when it was first released, why is this a questionable thing to do?

Just on that topic, having been watching a lot of Agatha Christie adaptations lately, the 2006 David Suchet version of Taken at the Flood had some… yikesy dynamics in it.

SPOILER ALERT for a 70-year-old Poirot novel

So major props to Elliot Cowan, who plays the vile David Hunter with a pitch-perfect mixture of domineering charm and manipulative smugness. In the novel, Hunter begins to manipulate the recently-arrived Lynn Marchment the same way he did serving girl Eileen Corrigan to the point that she breaks off an engagement with a local farmer for him, but the adaptation doesn’t offer enough interaction between the two to justify it. Lynn goes from telling Rowley (the farmer) that she’s still a virgin and wants to jump his bones on their wedding night to “wait, I love this smug controlling lizard-person” after like two scenes together.

It’s natural for Rowley to be upset by being cast aside for the most obvious villain since Bob Evil, but in both novel and adaptation, he takes his anger out on Lynn by assaulting her. Freshly traumatized with a strangling at the hands of her ex-fiance, Lynn then has to sit through the denouement, where the adaptation upgrades her new love from regular murderer to mass murderer, having blown up his own sister’s entire family and household with dynamite. But that’s only after impregnating a teenager, manipulating her Catholic faith by forcing her to abort the pregnancy, then controlling her with a morphine addiction.

And after all this, there’s still the indication that Lynn is in love with this guy. Blessedly, the adaptation has the good sense not to have Lynn go back to the guy who strangled her like the novel did, but I dunno… if I learned the person I was in love with blew up 12 people and kept his last girlfriend in his thrall with drugs… might affect my feelings for him as he’s off to the gallows.

SPOILERS END

The Suchet Poirot adaptations definitely got darker in tone near the end of the series, but Taken at the Flood just leaves you (and probably Lynn) feeling really dirty for having experienced it. A lot of Christie works tend to rack up the body count over their course, but other ones like Hallowe’en Party and Mrs. McGinty’s Dead had their moments of levity with the help of the supporting cast. Taken had zero levity and compounded it with hideous relationship dynamics that were probably questionable even in 1948 when it was written.

Just had to get that off my chest.

varalys the dark
2 years ago

So I turned 45 today which lands me slap in the middle of Gen X, with a Boomer mum, a Xer sister (Xennial is not a thing Chloe!), a Millennial sister, then we skip the zoomers/gen z/iGen and now I have two Gen Alpha nephews. The smaller of whom made me watch several hours of kids TV this morning.

I got videogames and sweeties as gifts. Also half a chocolate cake to myself. Birthdays are awesome.

Naglfar
Naglfar
2 years ago

@varalys the dark
Happy birthday!

Yutolia the Laissez-Fairy Pronoun Boner
Yutolia the Laissez-Fairy Pronoun Boner
2 years ago

Happy birthday Varalys!

I turn 40 next Wednesday… I’m in what I and some others like to call ‘the Oregon Trail Generation’.

Moon Custafer
Moon Custafer
2 years ago

@ Buttercup Q. Skullpants

Then there was that frustrating period where movies were out on VHS, but older or more obscure titles were either not out at all, or unavailable at one’s local video-rental place.

I consider myself extraordinarily lucky to be living in a time in which I can watch stuff like Johnny Come Lately (1943) or Ich Möchte Kein Mann Sein (1918) on Youtube.

SadOldGuy
SadOldGuy
2 years ago

At my niece’s wedding wedding two weeks ago, I only recognized two thirds of the music played while everything I missed was at at least a half decade old. Apparently my musical taste was finalized in 1994? I knew that I was old (see name) but not that old. So yes, age makes fools of us all.

Vic
Vic
2 years ago

At the risk of sounding like one of the Four Yorkshiremen, I remember before VHS, before cable, when movies came on TV once a year, with non-skippable commercials. The Wizard of Oz was an Annual Event. The Sound of Music was even rarer. You had to wait 2-3 years for theatrical releases to make it onto broadcast TV. The quality sucked – snow and rabbit ears, and changing the channel with pliers because your brother pulled the dial out during a squabble and hid it somewhere and then forgot where he stashed it.

“LUXURY! Back in MY day we used to have to act out shadow puppets on the wall from the fire of burning the last of our blankets…”

varalys the dark
2 years ago

Thanks peeps! The older I get the sillier I become 😀

I genuinely love have a Millennial sister, she kept me and in fact still keeps me up to date with what’s cool. Apart from music, we parted company there in 2001 when the last good music was made. Now I spend a lot of time watching kids TV again with my adorable nephews and I look forward to hopefully being the cool auntie as they get older.*

Lainy
Lainy
2 years ago

@Varalys the dark

Happy birthday and many more!

Now I spend a lot of time watching kids TV again with my adorable nephews and I look forward to hopefully being the cool auntie as they get older.*

Do you know the pain of Blippy? My now nephew is 3 and to young for me to get him into the good kids show so I’m stuch watching Blippy. Please tell me you know Blippy. Share the pain with me.

Yutolia the Laissez-Fairy Pronoun Boner
Yutolia the Laissez-Fairy Pronoun Boner
2 years ago

@Lainy: my cousin is 5. I know Blippy. I’m sorry you know Blippy too!

My cousin will watch for hours. He’s not allowed to go outside by himself because my dad’s family is terrified of everything, so this is what he mostly does.

varalys the dark
2 years ago

Thanks! And I’m in the UK, so not heard of Blippy. The terrible programme my two year nephew loves is called Bing, a CGI cartoon about a black humanoid bunny and his carer and it’s really, really, *really* boring. There’s good stuff, The Twirlywoos, Hey Duggee and Abney and Teal available at the touch of a button but nah, he wants Bing. Snore.

Lumipuna (nee Arctic Ape)
Lumipuna (nee Arctic Ape)
2 years ago

Naglfar – I vaguely recall the kids these days are called “generation Z” or informally “Zoomers”.

Congrats, varalys!

varalys the dark
2 years ago

Thank you!

Surplus to Requirements, Observer of the Vast Blight-Wing Enstupidation
Surplus to Requirements, Observer of the Vast Blight-Wing Enstupidation
2 years ago

I’m old enough to remember Betamax, and tape cassettes just beginning to replace vinyl.

We certainly have come far. (Pats 8TB external HDD loaded with 1080p BRrips: every Star Wars, Trek, and MCU film thus far released to BR, X-Men, Spider-Man, assorted other mostly action and SF films, and several gigs of music spanning the late 70s to now. All of it backed up on a second disk, of course. And all a few mouse clicks away without the need to juggle whole rooms filled with heavy pieces of furniture filled with little plastic boxes full of little plastic disks. Nor reliant on some streaming “service” that charges by the month, won’t work well over my shitty 3Mbps rural ADSL (or at all if the network or server is down), and randomly shuffles and removes things from its catalog from time to time according to some arcane formula that makes the one used to decide when to celebrate Easter seem sane. )

Naglfar
Naglfar
2 years ago

@Surplus

some arcane formula that makes the one used to decide when to celebrate Easter seem sane.

I’m Jewish and I don’t celebrate Easter, so out of curiosity, what is the formula for Easter? I had always assumed it was a Sunday in April, and never put much thought into the formula.

Shadowplay
2 years ago

First Sunday after the first full moon after the vernal equinox.

Moon Custafer
Moon Custafer
2 years ago

@ Lumipuna:

You’re probably right, but locally (Toronto) there was a magazine for a while for (I think) older Boomers called “Zoomers,” which I always assumed was some cutesy attempt to sound hip.

Redsilkphoenix: Jetpack Vixen, Intergalactic Meanie
Redsilkphoenix: Jetpack Vixen, Intergalactic Meanie
2 years ago

First Sunday after the first full moon after the vernal equinox.

The reasoning at the time for this formula was to help give pilgrims going to nearby holy sites for the holiday better light to spot any approaching bandits and fighting them off successfully.

Or so I’ve always heard. Could be wrong about why it really was done way back then.

Jenora Feuer
Jenora Feuer
2 years ago

@Naglfar, Shadowplay:
Essentially, yes, first Sunday after the first full moon after the vernal equinox, though the actual calculation is a bit more esoteric, based on the Metonic Cycle of 19 years == 235 months, and doesn’t rely on observations. It’s that way because the original Easter was tied to the Jewish Passover events (the ‘Last Supper’ was generally considered to be a Passover feast) and Passover is based on the Jewish lunar calendar. But when Christianity became tied to the Roman Empire after the First Council of Nicaea, a way to calculate it within the Julian solar calendar was needed.

There’s also the fact that the various Orthodox churches often celebrate Easter on a different day than the Catholic and (almost?) all Protestant churches, because the Orthodox churches never accepted the redefinition of the Easter calculations which came along with the Gregorian calendar. The main difference is that the Orthodox calculation doesn’t take into consideration all the leap days that got removed from the calendar to re-synchronize the vernal equinox, and so the Orthodox Easter averages a couple of weeks later.

(The Julian calendar had leap days every 4 years, while the Gregorian is the modern every 4 years, but not multiples of 100, but yes multiples of 400. There’s 13 days difference due to the removed leap days from 300, 500, 600, 700, 900, 1000, 1100, 1300, 1400, 1500, 1700, 1800, and 1900.)

Sorry, the history of calendars is one of those odd little aspects of history I happen to personally find fascinating.

Naglfar
Naglfar
2 years ago

@Jenora Feuer
I like calendars as well. Thank you for the additional information about Easter and the Metonic Cycle.
I’m familiar with the Jewish calendar, having used it for Jewish holidays, and I’ve noticed that most of the time Passover is around the same time as Easter. This has been an issue in the past for me, as I’ve tried to schedule Passover seders to which I invited non-Jewish guests, who often were unavailable around Easter.

Pie
Pie
2 years ago

There are some wonderfully steampunky/clockpunky mechanical computers built for the purpose of working out the date of easter.

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/7/7f/Strasbourg_Astronomical_clock_Comput_ecclesiastique.jpg/360px-Strasbourg_Astronomical_clock_Comput_ecclesiastique.jpg

None of them work forever though; the problem is too intractable for that. Turns out to be a bit of a weird rabbithole of nerdery.

StaceySmartyPantsTwiceRemoved
StaceySmartyPantsTwiceRemoved
2 years ago

It would be fun to make up a calendar. I mean, the whole creative process of deciding how you would measure what you wanted to measure and so on. I know sci-fi fit writers do stuff like that. For me personally time is more by what I feel than what something else says but I’m still just saying it would be fun maybe. But in my job I keep a real calendar that is what other people say it is and it’s really important and I like doing that too.

Jenora Feuer
Jenora Feuer
2 years ago

@Naglfar:
The Wikipedia page on Easter goes into a fair bit of detail, including having a table for several years which lists the dates of the Full Moon, Passover, Astronomical Easter, Gregorian Easter, and Julian/Orthodox Easter for each year.

This was actually one of the rare years in which the Gregorian Easter and the Astronomical Easter (first Sunday after the first full moon after the vernal equinox) were actually different, mostly because the full moon was actually on the day of the vernal equinox, and the ecclesiastical calculations are actually based on the 14th day after the new moon rather than the full moon as such, so it can be a day earlier depending on the lunar cycle. And the vernal equinox isn’t actually on the same day every year.

@Pie:
Calculating Easter is non-trivial for a computer, and is one of the reasons why the main recommendation for any sort of computer time handling is ‘find a library that does it already and use that’. I can easily see that doing it mechanically would be rather difficult.

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