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Scenes from yesterday’s anti-Roosh, anti-rape rallies. With bonus Jemaine Clement

toilet2
Flush Roosh

So yesterday was the big day, the day on which the famously repugnant pickup artist Roosh “No Means Yes” Valizadeh originally planned to hold 165 meetups for his fans around the world, only to cancel them after a bit of a public outcry — you may have heard something about that.

While some of Roosh’s fanboys ended up meeting in secret, the only Roosh-related events that took place in public yesterday (besides a sparsely attended press conference called by Roosh himself) were rallies against Roosh and all of the noxious things he stands for.

Here’s a roundup of pics and videos from a number of these anti-rape-culture rallies.

In Glasgow:

https://twitter.com/jonbradyphoto/status/696077539312320512?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw

https://twitter.com/jonbradyphoto/status/696080040178671616?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw

 

And a longer video:

More details here and here; the second piece also mentions a protest in Edinburgh.

In Wellington, New Zealand:

https://twitter.com/NathanRoss10/status/695879919880896512

https://twitter.com/PINKYFANG/status/696101569641582593

https://twitter.com/chrissybrown/status/695863971220357120

https://twitter.com/PINKYFANG/status/696048054512652288

Wait, you’re saying to yourself, surely that can’t be the real Jemaine Clement of Flight of the Conchords?

It is. He spent much of yesterday mocking the Roosh fanboys who showed up in his mentions.

Here’s a writeup on the protests there.

In Vancouver:

https://twitter.com/ashleylynch/status/696185668679012352

https://twitter.com/ashleylynch/status/696200789275119616

Lynch tells me that after she tweeted these pics she had “Roosh’s followers calling me at 1am and playing horror movies on my voicemail.” Because of course.

In Munich:

In Windsor, Ontario:

In Albuquerque:

More on that protest here.

There were also protests in Berlin; in Shrewsbury; in Newcastle (where a small contingent of the far-right English Defence League tried to hijack the protest); in New York City (though the only info I’ve found about it so far is from the blog of a Roosh fan) and presumably many other places as well.

If you have info or pictures or video of any of the other protests, please let me know by posting in the comments below, and I can add it to the post.

Here, by the way, is what things looked like at Roosh’s press conference yesterday.

I guess I’ll have to watch the video of the press conference and see just how thoroughly Roosh “destroys” the media, huh? He’s certainly done a fine job of destroying his own reputation as a human being.

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Bernardo Soares
Bernardo Soares
6 years ago

I never understood that “generation” talk. It’s such an arbitrary, generalising category that at any given time usually only ever describes a very small set of stereotypically white, middle class people.

Alan Robertshaw
Alan Robertshaw
6 years ago

@ Bernardo

I never understood that “generation” talk.

Not a fan of The Who then? 😉

Viscaria
Viscaria
6 years ago

That’s a very good point, Bernardo, and I was definitely playing into that. I will try to keep that in mind for future.

Bernardo Soares
Bernardo Soares
6 years ago

@ Alan

Used to be more of a Pink Floyd fan, myself 😉

@ Viscaria

That wasn’t meant as a criticism of your comments; I read them as appropriately snarky replies to Owen McLovely, who (without using the actual word, granted) played much, much more into that with this idea that single kids don’t wear used clothes, don’t have to share toys, have a lot of undeserved trophies and so on.

Alan Robertshaw
Alan Robertshaw
6 years ago

@ Bernardo

Speaking of generational issues, one of my mates gives himself away by referring to The Pink Floyd.

Buttercup Q. Skullpants
Buttercup Q. Skullpants
6 years ago

I shouldn’t have started reading this thread during breakfast…
But then, why did I think it was a good idea to read about roosh during breakfast anyway?

You got off lightly. I was eating hummus.

I never understood that “generation” talk. It’s such an arbitrary, generalising category that at any given time usually only ever describes a very small set of stereotypically white, middle class people.

Yeah, narcissism and negative attention-seeking existed long before millennials arrived on the scene. It’s nothing new. There’s just more fuel for it now, and more ways to achieve 15 minutes of fame (or infamy) outside of traditional mainstream media.

Somehow I don’t think Roosh would have turned out differently if he’d been forced to participate in team sports. He still would have considered himself above the rest of the sheeple on the team. Likely he would have been a selfish player, a glory hog, and someone who considered his athletic status to be both an entitlement and a buffer against the consequences of criminal behavior. Antisocial kids gonna antisocial, whether there’s internet or not.

Viscaria
Viscaria
6 years ago

Of course! How else to distinguish them from the other Floyds??

I didn’t think you were criticizing me, Bernardo, but your thoughts were valuable to me all the same 🙂 I’m happy for an opportunity to unpack my own assumptions.

Alan Robertshaw
Alan Robertshaw
6 years ago

@ viscaria

That was their original name.

Mind you, I keep showing my age by referring to ‘Southern Death Cult’. :-/

ETA: Multiple Floyds nearly became an issue when they split up. In one of the weirdest examples of copyright law fallout ever, when Roger Waters uses the flying pig balloon, his version has to have balls on it!

Viscaria
Viscaria
6 years ago

That was their original name.

What? I DID NOT KNOW THAT. It’s such a small thing but that is straight up blowing my mind.

Bernardo Soares
Bernardo Soares
6 years ago

when Roger Waters uses the flying pig balloon, his version has to have balls on it!

And now you have blown my mind, too.

Kimstu
Kimstu
6 years ago

One particularly asinine aspect of the Rooshie’s remarks that I thought warranted more than an eyeroll, because it’s frequently repeated by rape-culture apologists:

By attempting to teach men not to rape, what we have actually done is teach women not to care about being raped, not to protect themselves from easily preventable acts, and not to take responsibility for their actions. At the same time, we don’t hesitate to blame men for bad things that happen to them (if right now you walked into a dangerous ghetto and got robbed, you would be called an idiot and no one would say “teach ghetto kids not to steal”).

Bypassing the awkward fact that in fact we DO “teach kids” everywhere not to steal, the glaring flaw in this “argument” is that it’s attempting to equate the risks of an abnormally dangerous environment with the experience of everyday life.

Roosh and his ilk think it’s perfectly reasonable to expect women to deal with the same levels of fear and caution anytime and anywhere they might possibly encounter a man as we would expect men to deal with when going into a dangerous ghetto.

Avoiding specific neighborhoods which are known to be exceptionally dangerous, because normal society’s system of law and social contract has broken down in them, is NOT the same thing as having to take special precautions for one’s safety in every situation where one’s alone with a man. That false equivalence has the effect of normalizing forms of crime and predation that specifically affect women as something to be routinely expected from everyday life even in otherwise normally functioning societies. That’s what rape culture is.

Alan Robertshaw
Alan Robertshaw
6 years ago

@ viscaria

For a very brief iteration they were actually ‘The Pink Floyd Sound’, but even the hippiest of my mates don’t go that far back.

If you like that sort of trivia, you may be interested to know that when the Beatles lived in Germany in their early days (and wore jeans and leather jackets) they used fake names. McCartney went by ‘Paul Ramon’ which is where the best band ever got their name from.

Alan Robertshaw
Alan Robertshaw
6 years ago
Orion
6 years ago

Sie liebt dich, ja, ja, ja.

Bernardo Soares
Bernardo Soares
6 years ago

@ Orion

Seig mir den Weg sum Siel:

Dreadnought
Dreadnought
6 years ago

Happy Chinese New Year everybody!

WeirwoodTreeHugger
WeirwoodTreeHugger
6 years ago

EJ,
I’m fine with men being in FA, and although I’m no expert on the movement, even though it seems to be mostly made up of women, I’ve never seen anything that suggests men are unwelcome.

What I’m not okay with is the suggestion that it’s the job of feminists to create a fat acceptance for men. There’s no reason they can’t do it themselves. I’m also not okay with the suggestion that if we don’t do all of men’s emotional work and advocacy for them, we should expect them to want to rape, harass or kill us.

EJ (The Other One)
EJ (The Other One)
6 years ago

@kupo:

I’d argue that there is, indeed, a difference between how men and women experience sizeism and other body-negativity.

I’ve never been a woman, but I’m told by people I trust that a core part of female body-shaming is based around objectification, and around the notion that women’s bodies exist to make men’s penises happy.

On the other hand, in my experience male body shaming is much more about power: men are shamed for being too weak or unfit, and therefore unable to violently impose their will upon other people should the situation call for it.

I have seen Fat Acceptance and Health At Every Size oppose objectification directly by shifting the discussion about body size away from penis-pleasing and towards health, and I absolutely applaud that. (I’ve also seen them subvert objectification without opposing it, by arguing that people can please penises regardless of what size their body is; it’s not my place to criticise or to support this.) This is great. I’m not going to undercut this by making any sort of what-about-the-menz argument or anything like that. I am a hundred percent behind these movements.

However, the question remains: what would a male-oriented body acceptance movement look like? Because male body shaming isn’t about objectification, telling men that they look pretty even if they’re fat is a non-starter. Even if the topic is shifted so that we’re telling men that they don’t look weak if they’re fat, that doesn’t touch the toxicity at the heart of the issue: men are encouraged towards a physique which enables violence dominance, and which exists as a threat to others. Until the toxicity which underlies “do you even lift, bro?” and “I could kick your ass” and “check these abs, I could steal your girl” is confronted head-on, this isn’t going to change.

A male body acceptance movement, in my mind, would be one which stresses the fact that some guys are good at sports and some aren’t; some are good at having rock-hard abs and some aren’t; some are good at violence and some aren’t; but we’re all nonetheless equally male and equally acceptable.

@WWTH:

What I’m not okay with is the suggestion that it’s the job of feminists to create a fat acceptance for men. There’s no reason they can’t do it themselves. I’m also not okay with the suggestion that if we don’t do all of men’s emotional work and advocacy for them, we should expect them to want to rape, harass or kill us.

This. This, one hundred percent agreed.

What I meant with my initial comment, and what I evidently said very poorly, was: We male feminists need to do this. This isn’t our allies’ task. Saving the male gender has to be a male-led thing.

newbie
newbie
6 years ago

Roosh’s ‘press conference’ is as pathetic as one would expect. One highlight (and the best part): he asks a journalist “Do you even lift?”

Lindy West’s article was published early yesterday and the comment section was quickly closed (at 56 comments, if I recall) because of the deluge of misogynists. I see it is reopened now (maybe The Guardian got jealous of Raw Story where the piece drew a yuuuge crowd? 😉 ). Whatever the reason, the new comments are, um, interesting. The one just left by “Klarisa Lieb” may just be from Roosh himself.

Bina
6 years ago

Roosh may have started a new trend today: not only will assholes be crying “satire!” but we should prepare ourselves for declarations of “it was a thought experiment!”

Oh sure. Dragging a drunk woman back to his lair to rape her unconscious form sure involved a lot of thought, it did…

Still can’t imagine what kind of “experiment” would be so poorly conceived, and so unethically executed, though.

I think Roosh should be a colloquialism for steatorrhea: the excretion of abnormal quantities of fat with the feces owing to reduced absorption of fat by the intestine.

You take too many fish oil capsules, malabsorption ensues and, not only do you have fatty wet poops, but, if you’re lucky, between poops oil drips out of your bum. You can wipe a hundred times but there will still be oily skidmarks when you drop your drawers.

That’s Roosh.

An oily skidmark, possibly the kind left behind by one of those fake fats that dieters are supposed to eat, or those diet pills that hinder fat absorption? Definitely a candidate!

Keep ’em coming, folks…

Luzbelitx
6 years ago

I think the “generation talk” was a form of ageism-reinforced defense of status quo. It was the way old (straight cis white) men expressed:

– HA! Look at all those younglings, trying to make things different. Well, the abusive environment they are facing at all times will eventually break them, like it did to us! haha!

I get the impression that “generation-shaming” got more and more bitter, the more options the younger get. It also became more superficial.

A few generations ago it was “common knowledge” that “you climb on the horse (politics) from the left side, but you climb down the right”, like all progressive “kids” would eventually grow into conservatives.

As the cultural shell that kept their worldview together is falling to pieces, they need to point at smaller, sillier things that are simply different, because those which may produce a meaningful political or social change are already part of the regular political agenda.

So, old people (but especially guys) are left with “grown up politics” which include left AND right (and everything between/outsied of them), and can only criticize the way young people dress or the music they listen to -which they did before, but the “haha, we’ve went through the whole left-to-right lane and so will everybody else” that made them feel truly superior is long gone by now.

katz
6 years ago

Roosh is 36. He’s not “kids these days.” Hell, he might have actually been raised on Biggie and Nirvana.

Scildfreja
Scildfreja
6 years ago

I think the problem is a lot of guys and girls on the Intertoobs were raised by overprotective moms who didn’t let them play sports or get summer jobs because they were so pweshus. … If you have real friends you see the world differently.

@Owen McLovely – the following may read as an attack. I hope it doesn’t! Let me present a possible expansion of your thoughts.

All of these points are unsupported brown facts (i.e. they come from a butt). They feel right to some people, which is usually a good indication that they’re not right. Actually true things are awkward and weird and take some getting used to. This one:

– Blames a woman – check!
– Blames a woman for sentimentality and emotions over hard discipline – check!
– Blames counter-cultural movements (no sportsball! computer nerds!) – check!

The above are feel-good things that make it easier to believe that the opinion is true – confirmation bias in action (Any conclusion which assigns responsibility to someone other than the speaker does this. To avoid, don’t assign responsibility outside of yourself.). Here are some related things to think about:

– Many kids are teased and abused mercilessly by other kids, and this can be especially agonizing when referring to the sportsball. For many people, this results in nothing but anxiety and unhappiness when doing group-based physical activities. There are strong reasons – good reasons – to avoid these activities for these people. However, they learn teamwork in other ways. Humans are social. Organizing into groups is natural. Social skills develop regardless of the sportsball, honest.

– Discipline and sentimentality are not opposites. Good parenting has both. Your claim that moms (and apparently not dads?) are “overprotective” is unsupported. Citation please.

– When we were growing up and computers with internet was becoming a Thing, our parents had no idea what the hell was about to happen. They did the best they could with the knowledge they had at the time (in general). As a personal anecdote, I’ve found the people who are internet-savvy and connected to be far more empathetic, gentle, and open than those who aren’t. It’s the guys in my life who are all about the sportsball teams that are aggressively masculine, libertarian and judgmental.

Our opinions tend to say less about the world than they do about ourselves. Again – I don’t want to be accusatory with this post! But please, look at your opinions and ask yourself what they say about you.

Sincerely,

– a middle aged, unsporty, sentimental, virgin data scientist who is absolutely fine with all of that

Scildfreja
Scildfreja
6 years ago

I get the impression that “generation-shaming” got more and more bitter, the more options the younger get. It also became more superficial.

@Luzbelitx,

You have always been correct.

We have fallen upon evil times
and the world has waxed very old and wicked.
Politics are very corrupt.
Children are no longer respectful to their parents.

– King Naram Sin of Chaldea, ~ 3800 B.C.

I think it’s a bit more to do with cynicism than just a change in options, though. That’s just my thought!

Dreadnought
Dreadnought
6 years ago

@Bina

Einstein performed thought experiments but, unlike Roosh, he actually understood the nature of what he was experimenting on, and so could draw conclusions that reflected reality; of course we all know that reality is not Rooshs major priority.

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