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incels misogyny semen

Women are nothing but bags of sperm for men, declares man who doesn’t know why no women will date him

Once again I am asking incels to have a little bit of self-awareness.

Here’s an Incels.is post from one guy who apparently can’t figure out why women won’t date him.

“Men are better than foids at everything,” BornToDie begins, apparently unaware that he’s named himself after a Lana Del Rey song.

From the beginning, foids were never useful for anything other than being a bag of sperm for men. In every area of knowledge women are dominated by men, just look for the best artists of all genres, the best scientists, politicians and inventors in the world to be sure of that.

He’s aware there are historical reasons for this, but he doesn’t care.

Feminists will say that the reason for this is because women were prevented from studying and that they were forced to spend more time in the kitchen and taking care of the children, but you know what’s funny? even the best chefs in the world are men, that is, foids are such incompetent and dumb beings that they were surpassed by men even in the area they spent centuries working.

In your face, ladies!

anyway, it doesn’t take many arguments to refute what feminists say and it’s not hard to get to them. The first is that foids nowadays have access to education and receive even more perks than men and guess what? they still lack space in the highest places in society and I doubt this will ever change when they simply have lower IQs than men in general.

Not actually true, but then again when has anything an incel has said been true?

Another factor is that if women accepted to submit to men for so many centuries it is just another example of their stupidity. Feminists could argue that this was because men were physically stronger and more aggressive, but this is ridiculous, as intelligence and charisma are always a more determining factor for dominance than brute force, which is why dictators manage to oppress an entire nation despite being outnumbered of strength compared to the entire population of a country.

Yeah, it’s not like dictators use the brute force of military and police to suppress opposition or anything like that.

Our incel ends with a smidgen of genocide.

Foids only serve to hold society back. I keep imagining how much we could advance if we could eliminate all foids from society, but for that we would need to eliminate them from our biological needs.

In a followup comment he declares that women

should go back to being just sex slaves as they were before or to be replaced in the future by realistic androids.

And this is one of many reasons the robots will rise up against us.

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Allandrel
Allandrel
2 months ago

@Full Metal Ox

“Infection,” I believe. The Ikarrans, a species concerned about “genetic purity” after multiple alien invasions, created an autonomous weapon programmed to kill any members of their species that was not “pure” Ikarran. This ran into the predictable problem that no one actually met their definition of “pure” due to simple genetic drift, and the weapons exterminated the entire Ikarran species.

@moregeekthan

The Achilles and the Tortoise “Paradox,” like the Epimenides “Paradox,” convinces me only that many ancient Greek Philosphers were basically Jordan Peterson, coming up with “brilliant thought experiments” that fall apart when you apply actual logic to them like “maybe instead of movement being impossible and thus an illusion, your model is wrong” or “maybe Cretans sometimes tell the truth and sometimes lie, like, y’know, people.”

(Also in this category is Maxwell’s Demon, in which you decrease entropy without applying work by the brilliant measure of going “that work does not count as work because Shut Up That’s Why.”)

Dave
Dave
2 months ago

Maxwell’s Demon clearly requires an expenditure of energy to sort molecules. The issue is why. As conceived, all it is doing is opening a door when a fast molecule comes through and closing the door when a slow molecule comes through, but the energy to open and close the door can be made arbitrarily small. It’s not the shutter that is the solution to where does the entropy come from. It’s that the determination of whether a molecule is fast or slow is a process that increases entropy, because you can only measure something by interacting with it.

Snowberry
Snowberry
2 months ago

Epimenides “Paradox,”

Related: my response to “This statement is false” is “You’re lying.”

C.A.Collins
C.A.Collins
2 months ago

That thought experiment about Achilles and the tortoise is, I suspect, meant to demonstrate that space (distance) being infinitely divisible while time is finitely divisible, doesn’t explain observable reality. There’s also the paradox about the smallest possible instant for something to happen, A moves away from B the greatest distance possible in the smallest instant of time. But C also moves away from B the greatest distance possible in that unit of time, in the opposite direction. Therefore A and C moved twice the maximum possible distance from each other in the instant. Finitely divisible time and space don’t work either.

Dalillama
Dalillama
2 months ago

@CA Collins

All of which is mental masturbation by guyswho couldn’t be bothered actually going out and measuring what happens.

Surplus to Requirements
Surplus to Requirements
2 months ago

@C. A. Collins:

The error the Greeks made here might be forgiven, since it took until the early 20th century to discover special relativity and, in particular, that speeds don’t actually add linearly, and the sub-linearity gets significant as you approach the speed of light. If particles A, B, and C move apart as much as possible in a brief interval of time (Planck duration?) they’ve gotta be moving at light speed, where this effect is most extreme. They’ll all be receding mutually at the speed of light, rather than two of them receding at double the speed of light.

Which means quantum gravity can be put back on the table with its likely discretization of space and time … indeed, the paradox can be used to show that finitely divisible space and time requires relativity to work.

Infinitely divisible both-time-and-space, meanwhile, presents the problem of “ultraviolet catastrophes”. In particular, arbitrarily high frequencies would be possible, and thus arbitrarily large energy in any finite volume. One strong hint the universe gives against that comes from general relativity: energy going around in circles appears as mass from outside of those circles, and mass bends space-tim, and too much mass in too small a place disappears up its own ass and becomes a black hole, and the radius of a black hole scales linearly with its mass. So, there’s a maximum mass density for any given volume and it actually drops with increasing volume (as the cube root), explaining why the universe is so empty on the largest scales but has lots of small, dense objects separated by all that empty space … Quantum physics then points to limits on how much information can be stored per unit of mass. Turns out that grows quadratically, so the upper bound grows quadratically with radius in space. Information has to get less dense too on larger scales, and in some fundamental dense the universe is really only two-dimensional. All of its information contents could be projected onto an infinitely-removed surface at finite area-density, so the third spatial dimension is in some sense superfluous; as is the time dimension, since quantum unitarity forbids information being either created or destroyed. Time and three-dimensional space are in some senses illusions. It’s as if we’re characters in a movie, and somewhere “out there” is the film, flat and unchanging, and perhaps a projectionist …

Hints of this also turned up in string theory, one attempt to solve the problems of quantum gravity, where an exact duality was found between a particular model universe (unlike ours, and notably with cyclic time) and a two-dimensional projection surface (with time-evolution, but without gravity).

In the end, I suspect that the concept of information is key. Time and space are, ultimately, a way of deciding whether two things are “close enough to interact”, but without time, what does “interact” even mean? It has something to do with having information in common, or swapping certain bits of information. At the particle physics level, when particles interact, charges and angular momentum and stuff are conserved, but can be reshuffled among the interacting particles, so two different charges that started out on the same particle can go with two separate ones afterward and stuff like that. Without time, this looks like having some sort of edge-labelled planar graph with rules for certain numbers having to sum to zero around closed loops, and with quantum entanglement and superposition rules that allow for decohering branches (with negative mutual information, which is not possible with classical information but is with quantum information). Following a path along a tree of decohering branches leads to the illusion of new information being created, because of the negative mutual information with the roads-not-taken. That shows up as an entropy increase gradient along that path, and a thermodynamic arrow of time. As for the third spatial dimension and gravity, that probably has something to do with entropy as well. What does it mean that masses gravitate? Mostly that the forward-in-time direction bends toward the mass, as it turns out. If the forward-in-time direction is the direction of steepest entropy climb, and masses are where information is stored and processed, then mass would bend the entropy gradient toward itself. This isn’t quantitative and leaves major gaps in understanding (in particular, the local pastward direction also bends toward the mass, not away), but it’s suggestive.

Nilsine
Nilsine
2 months ago

Ewwww…I keep meaning to comment but this one…there are so many women who made giant leaps forward for us in tech and science. This is a great way to highlight just how in their own weird and disgusting little world incels live in.

Dave
Dave
2 months ago

All of which is mental masturbation by guyswho couldn’t be bothered actually going out and measuring what happens.

How were they to go out and measure? The tools to do the measurements that needed to happen to actually understand the universe weren’t around yet. Nor was the math around to describe the way the world works.

GSS ex-noob
GSS ex-noob
2 months ago

@Surplus: What you said.

Since 99.9% of the population doesn’t know anything about quantum physics now or in the past 100 years, certainly the ancient Greeks could have no idea. They didn’t even have magnifying glasses, the concept of pi, algebra, or the germ theory of disease.

But all this is much more interesting than incel losers.

@Snowberry: A lot of those philosophers didn’t submit their ideas to small children, who would have easily spotted them as preposterous. “ELI5” hadn’t been invented. If they’d just stated the “well duh” facts after telling the stories about arrows and tortoises, they’d have proved their point a lot better and look less like wankers down the centuries.

Speaking of tortoises and centuries, Jonathan is celebrating his (putative) 190th this week. He’s probably older than that, but no one knows.

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2022/dec/02/worlds-oldest-recorded-tortoise-prepares-for-190th-birthday-party

Love is All We Need
Love is All We Need
2 months ago

In her recent video the Pink Pill aka Christelyn Karazin discusses the latest incel violence hitting the news and their violence against Black women particularly. At around the 45 minute mark she reads her 2014 article which is relevant today.

Jenora Feuer
Jenora Feuer
2 months ago

When you get right down to it, the Achilles/Tortoise paradox isn’t even about space or time, it’s just straight math, and was essentially an argument by disbelief against the idea that an infinite series could have a finite sum. You don’t even need calculus to solve it, though some of the work on how to deal with infinite sequences in algebra wouldn’t really be more generally developed until later.

 A = 1/2 + 1/4 + 1/8 + 1/16 + 1/32 + ...
2A = 1 + 1/2 + 1/4 + 1/8 + 1/16 + ...
   = 1 + A
2A = 1+A => A = 1

That’s pretty much it. Infinities in general are a pretty difficult concept for most people to wrap their heads around.

Yutolia the Laissez-Fairy Pronoun Boner
Yutolia the Laissez-Fairy Pronoun Boner
2 months ago

Wouldn’t men technically be the bags of sperm?

KMB
KMB
2 months ago

Last time I checked, men were the sperm producers, so actually, they are the sperm bags. They literally have sperm bags dangling between their legs, too. Also last time I checked, I had a grad degree in Geoscience and worked as a darabase manager/programmer despite never formally learning it and did environmental reviews, and I build my own computers and program. I must be a total vegetable mentally. And I didn’t even know it! Good thing I got men around me to help me with all tjose taxing tasks… stop, hold on a second, I’m usually the one helping them out. Duh. That’s so weird.

Also, guess my great role model, Marie Curie, doesn’t exist and Einstein didn’t praise her intelligence and competence at all. Weird. I really must be secretly very stupid.

You know. At least I can look up information and gave critical reading comprehension. That already puts me miles above this bloody piece of trash.

GSS ex-noob
GSS ex-noob
2 months ago

@Jenora: NOVA recently had an episode on about zero and infinity. Entertaining, but nothing any of us didn’t learn in at least junior high.

@Yutolia: exactly!

@KMB:k I have a Marie Curie t-shirt. I was originally a chemistry major. It just has a picture of here and a simplified diagram of a radium atom, but all my friends and acquaintances recognize it. If someone doesn’t, I’m not likely to be friends with them anyway, am I?

KMB
KMB
2 months ago

@GSS ex-noob
Oh, cool! I focused on paleontology and geochemistry at university, especially isotopes which naturally plays right into her work. My professor showed a pucture of her in the first lecture when he explained what it was all about. She is highly regarded in that field, naturally. Without her, it wouldn’t exist, and we today wouldn’t know many awesome things.

That subject was academical love at first sight for me…

Jenora Feuer
Jenora Feuer
1 month ago

@KMB:
When I visited Warsaw back in the 1980s, one of the souvenirs I brought back was a Marie Curie commemorative coin. It had her profile on it and a series of lines on the back, one set curling off and spinning in one direction, one set gently curving in the other direction, and one set going straight across, representing Alpha, Beta, and Gamma radiation respectively. It also had her full name of Marie Sklodowska Curie, unsurprisingly for a Polish commemoration.

Surplus to Requirements
Surplus to Requirements
1 month ago

That’s odd. Don’t Polish words and names usually have jawbreaking sequences of four or more consonants in a row, like “lwcz”? I can actually pronounce that middle name without tongue gymnastics. 🙂

Jenora Feuer
Jenora Feuer
1 month ago

It’s actually Skłodowska; I missed the diacritical on the ł, which actually makes it sound more like an English ‘w’. So the old Polish currency ‘złoty’ is pronounced more like ‘zwoty’. And the ‘w’ in her name ends up more like an ‘f’ in English, just like the ‘w’ in German is pronounced like an English ‘v’ (and the German ‘v’ is an English ‘f’). So the actual pronunciation is more like ‘Skwodofska’, with the ‘o’s being close to the ‘aw’ sound of ‘off’.

And yes, I’ve had a co-worker with ‘szcz’ in his name, which makes more sense once you realize that ‘sz’ in Polish is pretty much ‘sh’ in English, and ‘cz’ maps to ‘ch’ as well. So ‘szcz’ becomes ‘sh-ch’. (Said co-worker was pleasantly surprised when I looked at his name written out and pronounced it relatively accurately on the first try.)

Though, yes, there is a reason why despite Skłodowska-Curie personally insisting on using both surnames, pretty much everybody outside of Poland drops the Slavic portion of the name.

Kat, ambassador, feminist revolution (in exile)
Kat, ambassador, feminist revolution (in exile)
1 month ago

Marie Skłodowska Curie trivia

She got married in either a black or dark blue (opinions vary) dress so that she could wear that same dress in the laboratory. Stains and holes don’t show so much when you wear a dark dress.

I learned this factoid when I was 11 and read a kids’ biography of her. I was pretty puzzled as to why radium could both help cancer patients and kill her. It turns out that dosage is important.

Marie Skłodowska Curie: my hero for many years now.

Surplus to Requirements
Surplus to Requirements
1 month ago

Well, at least we can all agree that Welsh is worse. I came across this substring in some Welsh text once: “rpwllgw”.

Yes, that is seven, count them, seven consecutive consonants.

And that is assuming that the “y” that came next was functioning as a vowel. (Dear God in heaven, please let that “y” have been a vowel.)

Alan Robertshaw
Alan Robertshaw
1 month ago

I quite like Welsh. It’s very lyrical. Not unakin to Cornish.

Having said that…

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