Categories
Uncategorized

Incel Redditor: “Women were never meant to control their own reproduction”

I’m tearin’ down your brooder house
‘Cause now I’ve got the pill

By David Futrelle

So I’ve been poking around the BlackPillScience subreddit, where the regulars discuss the latest scientific research that proves ugly dudes have it harder than non-ugly dudes in life and love. And they do, to some extent, but then again there are plenty of ugly dudes who have great lives and get laid on a regular basis, “black pill” be damned.

Anyway, actual scientists do research on this shit and these guys discuss it. But let’s just say that the discussions are a little less scientific than the papers under discussion.

Take this little comment-cum-manifesto posted in a topic discussing arranged marriages among current-day hunter-gatherers.

Listen carefully, women were never meant to control their own reproduction. It’s entirely unnatural and has adverse consequences on culture and the foundations of civilization.

But of course birth control is a-OK if men want to use it.

If a man does not wish to impregnate a woman then all he has to do is wear a condom or pull out at the appropriate time (or both). But at all times it should remain his choice, not hers.

What’s not good for the goose is good for the gander.

People in ancient civilizations used to watch the calendar and only had sex when appropriate. This system successfully facilitated humanity’s rise for literally thousands of years. When a woman has control over her own biology it opens up far too many options that adversely affect us all in immeasurable ways.

If you want to reject all medical technology invented since the ancient Egyptians, feel free to go right ahead, dude.

When women control their own reproduction it facilitates promiscuity, hypergamy, feminism, labor market disruptions, housing inflation, and beta male exclusion.

“Beta male exclusion?” Dude, birth control makes it less risky to have heterosexual sex. This benefits everyone who likes to have heterosexual sex, including so-called beta males.

Beta males are not inferior, they are in essence what builds civilizations and enables the privileges that both men and women currently take for granted.

It would be rather difficult to maintain civilization without the work of women. But yes, the majority of men do the majority of the work that men do.

It is only by forcing an equitable distribution of women among men than this thing we call civilization is maintained in the long run.

Well this is just a tiny bit chilling, huh — even though it’s only a smidgen blunter than Jordan Peterson’s “enforced monogamy.” How exactly would one go about “forcing an equitable distribution of women among men?” You can’t treat women like they’re government cheese.

Here’s Loretta Lynn offering a rebuttal on behalf of married women tired of having no control over their reproductive lives. I’ll take the Loretta pill over the black pill any day.

Send tips to dfutrelle at gmail dot com.

We Hunted the Mammoth relies entirely on readers like you for its survival. If you appreciate our work, please send a few bucks our way! Thanks!

91 Comments
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments
Lainy
Lainy
1 year ago

I had no sex education except for a video in the 5th grade (10 to 11 years old) about how the cis female body would change during puberty. Nothing about boys, and the main thing I remember from the video was It telling us just because your body is ready to have a baby, doesn’t mean you are. And there was heavier set girl in the video, insecure because she didn’t look like her slightly more developed friend and her mother telling her she was perfect and growing in her own way at her own pace.

Naglfar
Naglfar
1 year ago

O/T: TERFs have come up with a new argument: that trans* women are not women because…aliens?

Cyborgette
Cyborgette
1 year ago

Oh, sex ed, I remember that. One of the instructors told us that the fundamental truth was, I quote: “Boys only want one thing, and girls don’t know what they want.” This managed to get me and one of my frenemies on the same side of an argument (against the instructor) for probably the only time ever.

There was also a video on abusive relationships, which was basically about how other women won’t help you, and you have to rely on the protection of male relatives against abusive male partners. I hated it, thanks.

Oh, this was Massachusetts in 2005 or so. Liberal state, 21st century, town that votes 60-70% Democratic. The school also had an “I don’t want to be a statistic” PSA exhorting girls to not walk home alone after dark, and to be accompanied by a boy so they wouldn’t be raped and murdered by strangers. Just a bottomless pit of victim blaming and male protectionism, and this was a “progressive” sex ed agenda.

Naglfar
Naglfar
1 year ago

@Cyborgette
I was also in Massachusetts. I’m sorry you had to go through that.

Masse_Mysteria
Masse_Mysteria
1 year ago

@Cyborgette

The school also had an “I don’t want to be a statistic” PSA exhorting girls to not walk home alone after dark, and to be accompanied by a boy so they wouldn’t be raped and murdered by strangers.

I feel sick for reading into this that it’s somehow better to be raped and murdered by someone you know. Sorry for what you had to endure.

I don’t remember a lot about sex ed, which I’m chalking up to gender dysphoria and trying to not pay attention. I do seem to remember some sort of cartoonish educational video we watched, where there was something about how penises all look different when flaccid but somehow the same when they’re erect. I felt suspicious of that, but now I’m guessing the idea was that small variations don’t affect function or something.

Oh, and we had a board game about pregnancy. Something about spinning a wheel to see if there was conception, and the odds being different at different parts of the menstrual cycle. The downside was that if there was no conception, you couldn’t advance, which had the upside of some boys complaining loudly after the lesson how boring it was. “I didn’t even get pregnant, it was rubbish!”

Naglfar
Naglfar
1 year ago

@Masse_mysteria

I feel sick for reading into this that it’s somehow better to be raped and murdered by someone you know.

Society unfortunately does perpetuate the idea that rape is mainly a risk from strangers when the vast majority of rapes are by someone the victim knows. This is something that really needs to be addressed.

penises all look different when flaccid but somehow the same when they’re erect

It could also have been in reference to how circumcised penises look different when flaccid compared to uncircumcised but look more similar when erect. Or just to make penis-havers feel better if their penis doesn’t look like others.

Masse_Mysteria
Masse_Mysteria
1 year ago

@Naglfar

Or just to make penis-havers feel better if their penis doesn’t look like others.

This seems the likelier explanation. The video we watched wasn’t Finnish. It had been dubbed into Finnish but came from some other Nordic country (for some reason I think Denmark? Norway?), but AFAIK circumcision isn’t common in the Nordic countries, so I don’t think that would have been a consideration.

Cyborgette
Cyborgette
1 year ago

@Naglfar

TBH I’m pretty sure I escaped the worst of it by being male at the time. People acted like I was smoking something when I objected to that stuff, but that’s all they did.

Another example: I was accepted to SUNY Stony Brook, but dropped them in favor of UMass Amherst because (at the time) they had combo locks on all women’s restrooms in the dorms. Nobody seemed to understand why I thought this was stupid, ineffective, and denigrating. For all I know that policy might still be in place there.

@Masse_Mysteria

Oh that’s the thing, male protectionism (IDK if that’s the correct term in feminist theory but whatever) is built on that idea of stranger rape. And racism. So, so fucking much racism.

I’m not gonna ‘splain (whitesplain? AMABsplain?) the whole thing, just. This really is part of the Matrix we live in, and the more you learn about it the more you see it everywhere, and the more nauseating it gets.

Naglfar
Naglfar
1 year ago

@Cyborgette

TBH I’m pretty sure I escaped the worst of it by being male at the time. People acted like I was smoking something when I objected to that stuff, but that’s all they did.

Can relate. So many times I’d call out a male acquaintance on sexism when he thought there were no women around, and all the men would laugh it off. Especially with men I was related to, like my father or cousins.

Cyborgette
Cyborgette
1 year ago

Soooo apparently the thing I’ve usually referred to as “male protectionism” is known more technically as a subset of “benevolent sexism”. See here:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ambivalent_sexism

It’s kind of horrifying (but also validating) how closely this fits with my own experience TBH, especially stuff like “benevolently sexist men are still likely to blame victims”.

Ohlmann
Ohlmann
1 year ago

I remember my reaction at 16 year old to “learning” that somehow a female rugby pro was less likely to repel an aggression than a 50kg 16 year old young man. Like, are you serious ?

At the time, I thought it was because of videogames and people thinking that there are roaming monsters to defeat/kill. Actually, it’s probably the opposite, with the cliche of random (bad) encounter in videogames and RPGs coming from the male fantasy of having to protect peoples.

Cyborgette
Cyborgette
1 year ago

@Ohlmann

Oh my gods. Oh my gods. That. That is such a thing. Media portrays male bodies as made of iron and female bodies as made of tissue paper, and people get all surprised when internalization of those ideas makes men overconfident and women scared to do anything. It’s a complete brainfuck.

People are always shocked by how angry I get about physical gender inequality, especially the murderous rage when I see really big men just soaking up physical blows like it’s nothing. I know now that sexism and misogyny are more complex than that, but it’s hard to forget seeing the damage that invulnerability does – and that belief in invulnerability, founded or otherwise. It’s hard to stop thinking that we’ll never have a truly safe or just world until that strength is cut down to our level, or just destroyed entirely a la 70s radical feminist utopias.

Lumipuna
Lumipuna
1 year ago

Masse Mysteria:

I do seem to remember some sort of cartoonish educational video we watched, where there was something about how penises all look different when flaccid but somehow the same when they’re erect.

To quote Anna Karenina, “All happy penises look happy in the same way”

Ohlmann
Ohlmann
1 year ago

@Cyborgette : well, depend on what you call a truly safe of just world. My idea of it is probably not possible period.

One of the big thing is that tearing down the corrupt system isn’t enough. The roman empire was a big patriarcal clusterfuck, and its fall didn’t help in any way. One also need to steer society in the right direction, too.

Podkayne Lives
Podkayne Lives
1 year ago

In addition, rhythm methods have been around for a long time. And although it’s probably not considered birth control by modern definition, sex workers in Ancient Rome (and possibly elsewhere) used anal sex to avoid pregnancy.

Common in Renaissance Italy, among non-sex-workers as well. The Church regularly hollered about it, but middle-class people had a vested interest in spacing children out.

numerobis
numerobis
1 year ago

Ohlmann: For me, sex definitely feels way better without a condom *if* I can just have fun.

But I can’t if my partner is potentially fertile. Withdrawal distracts from my fun more than a condom does; also it’s way riskier. Navigating how to get an abortion isn’t much fun at all. And I haven’t tried but it doesn’t seem like the best plan to have a kid before you’re ready.

Conclusion: I usually wear a condom.

%d bloggers like this: