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#ResistTrump actual activism feminism trump

Did you protest Trump? Share your story!

Who’s got two middle fingers and opposes Trump? This gal!

An estimated 2.5 million people, mostly women, marched today against Trump worldwide. Others protested yesterday. Were you one of them? Share your story, share your pictures and videos in the comments! Or any good photos and videos you’ve run across online.

I think what we’ve got here is a real mass movement.

No trolls or Trump fans in this thread, please.

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SciFiGeekForever
SciFiGeekForever
5 years ago

My father and I marched at our local Women’s March in Northern California. It was wonderful to see the variety of ages and genders. There was a minimum of 5,000 people in attendance. So many great signs too! I’m a giant geek so my favorite was a little boy holding a “Spidey ‘n’ me for equality” sign. I had to give him some of the Marvel stickers I carry in my purse. Seeing all the matches across the world really did help my spirit.

kupo
kupo
5 years ago

For anyone interested, there are more activities planned. This first one is really only something USians can do since it involves writing to our senators, but keep an eye out for future actions, as some might apply globally. Also, there’s no reason not to write to your own representatives about issues that concern you!

https://www.womensmarch.com/100

@Petal
Your tattoo is beautiful!

@Lord Pabu
Love the hat and the hair. 🙂

Lord Pabu
Lord Pabu
5 years ago

@Imaginary Petal, Epitome, and Kupo

Thank you thank you thank you! XD I have a feeling I’m going to be wearing that hat a lot more often now. The blue hair is a wig (my real hair does not hold color well, for all my efforts), I just liked the color contrast. And it’s a cool wig.

@EJ

That little girl with the Never Surrender sign sounds like a force of nature. I’m reeeaaally tempted to get my 4 year old niece to hold a similar sign and make a political print out of it. I made a lot of political art when I was getting my fine art degree. It was what I was known for, but I’ve been neglecting the subject lately. I’m feeling like it’s time to get myself back in action.

Here’s a painting my niece insisted on helping me with. She was three years old at the time. You can see the marker she used in the scribbly interference on the protest sign still. I left it because I liked the chaos of it, though I wasn’t sure how my professor would respond to it at the time. I even put it up in my Senior Exhibition before I graduated. XD

http://i1239.photobucket.com/albums/ff505/PowellAJ13/Protest%20Painting%20Shit%20Is%20Fucked%20Up%20And%20Stuff_zpsv9kn8hsi.jpg

(Forgive the questionable picture quality. My biggest failure as an artist is that I’m not only inconsistent with social media and have almost no online presence, but I’m also not good at archiving my work well. : / )

((And forgive my rambling, too. I’m getting all nostalgic and inspired up in here))

Dalillama, Shepherd of Demonic Crocodiles
Dalillama, Shepherd of Demonic Crocodiles
5 years ago

@Zardoz, Nicki
Hello, fellow Portlanders!

@Lord Pabu
Love the hair. And the painting is excellent!

@IP
Very nice!

Lord Pabu
Lord Pabu
5 years ago

@Imaginary Petal

I really like that compass design. What a clever way to express gender identity!

Karalora
Karalora
5 years ago

@kupo

Thanks much for that link! One of the personal hurdles I face with this sort of thing is figuring out which of the many possible specific actions to take at any given time. It’s good to have a coordinated plan to refer to.

aqua
aqua
5 years ago

@Lord Pabu I hear you re art and self promotion!

aqua
aqua
5 years ago

@Banananana dakry
Me too! Im so ashamed, but I was exhausted and I have MS. The combination of Brexit and Trump has utterly drained me.

EJ (Marxist Jazz Weasel)
EJ (Marxist Jazz Weasel)
5 years ago

@Lord Pabu:
That’s a wonderful picture. I love the superposition of various different types of protest imagery.

Hambeast (fan of diversity)
Hambeast (fan of diversity)
5 years ago

Well, I was all set to go to the march in San Diego when Husbeast informed me that we had a wedding to attend (I had the idea for weeks that it was going to be today for some reason.) There was simply no way to get from downtown SD to the hilly country ranch some 30 mins. east of Ramona in time. I had already made a pussy hat and everything!

It was (at least) a wedding that would make a lot of the fascist faction unhappy; a gay woman and a gender-fluid person. It was one of the most joyful and gorgeous weddings I’ve had the honor to attend. It was also outdoors and cold as hell but there were a lot of bodies to keep everyone from freezing, all anyone needed to do was wiggle themselves into a welcoming cluster of well-wishers. I had to do that like, twice.

I do hope that there are other events I can wear my pussy hat to!

DrHoveiny
DrHoveiny
5 years ago

My friends and I went to the Chicago March, which we found out was “cancelled” while we were in the thick of it. That just meant it didn’t run the original route, but spilled over into all the other closed off streets. It was an eerily nice day, I almost felt like I could get sunburned at one point. I had a sign and kept getting asked if people could take pictures of it. There was so much creativity and humor everywhere around us. People were all being great to each other and there was an amazing vibe. Man I hope we have more. I’m so motivated now.

Karalora
Karalora
5 years ago

@DrHoveiny

I had never been to such an event before (and I’m almost 40!). One thing I realized is that while marches and rallies don’t create change on their own, they help keep the momentum going. I am physically exhausted after yesterday (still) but emotionally invigorated. We can see just how many of us there are, especially compared to the dishonorable opposition, which brings morale up. We can also make contacts, gather information, and get involved with organizations in order to do the real work of the movement. Marches are not the vehicle, but they contribute a lot to the propulsion.

Alan Robertshaw
5 years ago

I can’t figure out how to embed tweets so you’ll just have to do this old school and click (it’s moderately worth it)

https://mobile.twitter.com/WearyWithToil/status/822963379753123843

Lorcan Nagle
Lorcan Nagle
5 years ago

I was at the march in Dublin, various sources have said 2,000 and based on other marches I’ve been on that seems right. It was a great crowd, a lot of Americans, of course, but plenty of Irish people and I heard a smattering of other accents. Speakers included two pro-choice groups (The Coalition to repeal the 8th Amendment and the Abortion Rights Campaign, I’m a member of the latter and we provided a lot of logistical support), the Anti-Racism Network, Democrats Abroad, and two of the organisers.

Lord Pabu:

For me, the most poignant protest sign said “44 years later I march for my 3 daughters and 2 grandsons.” She’d been fighting for equal rights for decades, only to have to fight on. There were old women in wheel chairs, being pushed by their daughters and granddaughters. It hurts to know that they deserve to have seen equality by now, we all deserve equality by now, but it’s inspiring to see a continued will to resist even in people who have been standing up for their rights longer than I have been alive.

A photo went viral after the March For Choice in Dublin last year of two women standing in the same spot to show their support for abortion rights in Ireland, 30 years apart. One of them is an aunt of mine, and naturally we ran into each other at the Women’s March, she was stewarding while I was handing out badges and ferrying gear back and forth between the ARC office and the rally!

SpleenyBadger
SpleenyBadger
5 years ago

I went to the march here in Sydney, Australia. Wasn’t able to stay to march, but I did stay for the opening speeches. It was an amazing feeling, such a mixture of joy, anger, and determination for change. Seeing coverage of marches all around the globe made my heart swell.

Ledasmom
Ledasmom
5 years ago

Got pictures today of my hats down in Washington! Even the one that turned out too small because I was still learning my way around a hat loom got used – my designated hat distributor found a small girl to give it to. I am sorry I missed the march, but glad the hats made it there.

Yutolia
Yutolia
5 years ago

I sing with the Denver Women’s Chorus, which is a feminist LGBT chorus. We had a concert on Saturday and our theme for this season was water, it’s crucial part in the cycle of life, and also the incredible water waste and pollution that is putting us and so many other species in serious danger. We had already set the time and location in stone a while ago, and it would’ve been a nightmare relocating. We also realized that since our concert theme was already centered on environmental issues, and always is also about LGBT and women’s issues, we would be a part of the march even though we weren’t there, plus our guest artist (Chris Williamson) performed at the march before she came to perform with us, and gave everyone news about what was happening, etc. most of our audience attended as well. 100,000 people in Denver!!

It was amazing and awesome and exhausting (both emotionally and physically) and I am so honored to have been a part of it.

Alpine, RN
Alpine, RN
5 years ago

Dr. Alpine accompanied me to the DC march in solidarity, and he was approached all the way down to the march by Trump supporters politely asking HIM for directions… (probably because he’s a bearded white guy wearing flannel)…one of them was like “all these stupid feminists in town” while I was STANDING RIGHT NEXT TO HIM wearing a bright screaming pink scarf and headband…Dr. Alpine gave him…inaccurate directions to the Trump Hotel :-p

The march itself was a great deal of fun, although having over half a million people in one place is a bit scary.

Nick G
Nick G
5 years ago

I attended the “Sister March” – actually a static demo, outside the American consulate in Edinburgh (Scotland – I guess there’s probably an Edinburgh somewhere in the USA), because a march permit wasn’t applied for in time. About 2,000 people there, mostly not the people I usually see at Edinburgh political events, predominantly younger women but a good sprinkling of men and older women, great atmosphere, some witty placards, good speeches – although a poor PA system, so I couldn’t hear them until I wormed my way to near the front. One was by Leah Higgins, the 16-year-old school student who organised the march with her friend Calum Stuart, starting a couple of weeks ago – they thought maybe 30 of their friends would turn up. Another was by a woman whose name I didn’t catch, from Menie, near the golf course Trump had built on the north-east coast – trashing a site of special scientific interest (SSSI), and subjecting residents who refused to sell their homes to him to years of bullying (still going on). The story of this is told in “You’ve Been Trumped” – see it if you get the chance!

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