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a woman is always to blame antifeminism big daddy government birth control citation needed evil single moms evil women misogyny MRA only men pay taxes apparently warren farrell

Fox News host Jessie Watters channels Warren Farrell (and NWOslave) with inane comments on the government as a substitute husband

Fox News host Jessie Watters: seemed to be channeling Warren Farrell with some particularly obtuse remarks he made recently on the Fox show “Outnumbered” on the “single ladies” vote.

Hillary Clinton needs the single ladies vote. I call them ‘The Beyoncé Voters’ — the single ladies. Obama won single ladies by 76% last time, and made up about a quarter of the electorate. They depend on government because they’re not depending on their husbands. They need contraception, health care, and they love to talk about equal pay.

If we ignore the implicit racism of his castigating “Beyonce voters” for being welfare “takers,” Watters is more or less rehashing an old, bad argument that Farrell made in The Myth of Male Power. In a section of the book called “Government as Substitute Husband,” Farrell wrote that “when divorces left women without husband-as-savior, many women looked for substitute saviors … .”

While New Age women turned to gurus and traditional women turned to God the Father or his alleged earthly representatives, Farrell wrote, feminist women either opted

to save themselves or to turn to the biggest savior of all – government as substitute husband. … Divorces led bodies of men (called legislatures) protecting women collectively as other men (called husbands) failed to protest women individually. This meant raising taxes mostly on other men to provide money mostly for women. When divorces deprive women of husbands to protect them, then, our collective unconscious still wants to protect women.

Farrell attempted to hand-wave away the inconvenient fact that the overwhelming majority of those running the government are men by suggesting that

a legislator is to the voter what a chauffeur is to the employer – both look like they’re in charge but both can be fired if they don’t go where they’re told.

So apparently the “chauffeurs” in government are completely at the mercy of women voters, since women make up a small majority of voters.

Given how laughably simplistic – and just plain wrong — this argument is, it’s kind of astounding to think that Farrell has a degree in Political Science.

Farrell’s “Big Daddy” government theory was also popular with one of this blog’s most prolific trolls, a fellow calling himself NWOSlave. Some sample comments (each paragraph is from a different comment of his; click on them for links).

Are all you gals sexually empowered now? How’s the new feminist family workin out? Woman + children and man is seperate. Big Daddy done up and took his place. If a man’s got no rights to his family, don’t expect him to have obligations either. You gals are the head of the household now.

Big Daddy will suck every last penny from the serfs to satisfy your slightest whim. The vote is your’s and the western world is exactly the way you’ve created it.

If a precious woman cries sexual harrassment ya call Big Daddy to punish the bad man. Dontcha? Men stand up individually for themselves. Women run to the State and demand punishment.

Exactly like a spoiled little child, women walk around slutwalking and demand Big Daddy spend lotsa time and money to guard their precious feelings. Big Daddy says, “sure” I’ll take your money and bill it to the people. Next, these same moronic women tromp about in their idiotic wallstreet protest. None of them have a clue as to why anyone is poor, (think entitlements).

There’s plenty more where that came from, but you get the idea. He went on and on and on about this. Then again, he went on and on and on about everything.

NOTE: Quotes from Farrell taken from pages 237-238 of the original hardback edition of The Myth of Male Power.

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Ally S
7 years ago

I love the term Misogynoir. It’s perfect. Can I borrow that?

I don’t know what you mean by “borrow”, but you certainly should use it to describe black women’s experiences of misogyny.

Ally S
7 years ago

“Misogynoir” makes me want to invent a new confectionery product called Misogynuts.

Please don’t make this joke. Misogynoir is a real thing and shouldn’t be used for some joke, especially if you aren’t a black woman.

markb
markb
7 years ago

The reference to Beyonce is because she wrote a song called “Single Ladies”. Clearly, this is a man who is hip to what the kids are listening to these days.

weirwoodtreehugger
7 years ago

Why they think further alienating the voters they don’t have is going to net them more votes is baffling. Saying “We hate women and minorities sooooooo much” over and over isn’t going to make white dudes vote twice. And saying “yeah well, if you don’t vote for me, you’re a dumb” isn’t going to work nearly as well as, say, listening to a demographic and trying to meet it’s needs through policy.

It’s funny because after the 2012 elections the Republicans tried to figure out why they lost and actually came to the correct conclusions. That they’re alienating people of color (I think they’ve given up on black voters but they used to do OK with Hispanic voters), women who aren’t white + married, and young people. They decided they needed to do better at not being racist, sexist, and homophobic.

However, that would mean a complete overhaul of their policies and the way talk and it would involve pissing off the base so they’ve failed completely. They even held a summit on making the party more diverse in a former plantation. If anything they’ve doubled down on the racism.

As much as they claim there’s no war on women, I know they’re not going to be able to help themselves if Hilary Clinton becomes the Democratic nominee. The misogyny will flow like wine. And yes, the MRAs and Fox News lovefest will grow.

kiki
kiki
7 years ago

My apologies for the thoughtlessness. My stupid pun wasn’t intended to have any connection to ‘misogynoir’ beyond the fact that the latter word made me realise that you could make new words by replacing the last syllable of ‘misogyny’ with a word beginning with ‘n’ (in itself hardly the most startling or original comedic revelation, I know), but I can see how it may have seemed as if I was mocking that word or its use.

Ally S
7 years ago

@kiki

The thing about black women’s discourses is that they are often mocked or ignored, and making jokes like that can contribute to said dynamic. So I’m glad you understand.

sparky
sparky
7 years ago

Someone on Fox News saying something bigoted an stupid sadly does not surprise me.

The fact that Fox News hasn’t been laughed off the air by now is quite alarming.

fromafar2013:

(from the above sites)

% of total US population in poverty in 2012: ~15%
% of total US population receiving public assistance in 2012: ~4%

That’s fucking ridiculous.

Yes, it’s also a fucking shame and embarrassment that one the wealthiest industrialized nations on earth won’t provide services and aid to its impoverished citizens.

Fnoicby
Fnoicby
7 years ago

Oy, now I have the chorus of “Single Ladies” stuck in my head!

Who are they calling “single ladies” anyhow? I’d guess the majority of ladies on birth control pills have chosen to do so because they are regularly sexually active with the same partner. But I guess that doesn’t fit the “sluts living it up on the government dime” narrative too well.

Emmy Rae
Emmy Rae
7 years ago

Actually maybe we should focus on more song-based voting demographics. Exes who live in Texas, Hoes in Different Area Codes, Babies Who Grow Up to be Cowboys, Scrubs, etc

brooked
7 years ago

@WWTH

I realize I dumped all the statistics on this thread without much explanation, but it’s because I was attempting to highlight how much the Republicans rely on white men and women voters in the red states. They haven’t written off black voters, they’ve cast them as villains in order to gin up their base. Hence “Beyoncé voters” and Obama Derangement Syndrome. Fox New’s race baiting is out of control and the Fox Nation comment boards read like Stormfront at this point. Google “Moochelle Obama” if you want to feel great sorrow and rage.

Amusingly in the Republicans post-2012 autopsy, one of their main planned outreach to women was to appeal to married women of color, simply because they have pretty much have written off single women in most of the country. Of course, when Republicans say women of color they mean Latinos and, to a lesser extent, Asians.

I don’t see how they will attract Latino voters. The thing that’s tearing the Republicans apart is immigration, because the anti-immigration tea partiers are alienating the key growing demo of the future and demanding the party block any immigration reform. Back in the Reagan years conservatives thought the majority of Latinos would be Catholic, socially and fiscally conservative, and anti-black, aka Republican. Latinos were turned off by the awful things Romney said about undocumented immigrants during the Republican primaries and are pretty alienated at this point.

markb
markb
7 years ago

So can we call Republican voters “Hunter Thompson voters” because they vote based on Fear and Loathing?

Argenti Aertheri
7 years ago

Only if they start yelling about this being bat country!

katz
7 years ago

Actually maybe we should focus on more song-based voting demographics. Exes who live in Texas, Hoes in Different Area Codes, Babies Who Grow Up to be Cowboys, Scrubs, etc

Smooth Criminals? Sk8er Bois? California Girls? Paperback Writers?

Emmy Rae
Emmy Rae
7 years ago

Electric Ladies!

katz
7 years ago

Pff, everyone knows electric ladies can’t vote.

markb
markb
7 years ago

They can, in Electric Ladyland.

Isabelle
Isabelle
7 years ago

“So can we call Republican voters “Hunter Thompson voters” because they vote based on Fear and Loathing?’

I don’t know. I often feel that the urban middle class democrats does not really get what makes the rural blue collar conservatives tick. Which is in part why right wing radio talk show hosts and televangelists have more influence on them then Howard Zinn, Bill Maher and Chomsky combined. There is a clash of values that goes deeper than fear and loathing, imo. And there are few authors writing about it who know the culture from the inside. I can only think of Janisse Ray, Joe Bageant and Wendel Berry.

Phoenician in a time of Romans
Phoenician in a time of Romans
7 years ago

Well, he’s got a point – isn’t everybody sick of those so-called “Vaginal-Americans” sneaking over the borders and taking our jobs? And then going on welfare while taking our jobs after sneaking over our borders? And then trying to get abortions while going on welfare while taking our jobs after sneaking over our borders? Then working when they should be raising their kids after trying to get abortions while going on welfare while taking our jobs after sneaking over our borders?

Oh, for the good old days.

Argenti Aertheri
7 years ago

Isabelle’s got a point. My upstate NY relatives, well, one in particular, enjoy mocking my college. All how if I have (most of) a psych degree, well I oughta be able to fix myself then!

College is a stupid waste of time, don’t need no college to milk a cow! Ok, mocking my least favorite relative that I ever have to actually put up aside, education? “They’ve” all fucked it up, this “new math” (wtf is with that one?) and how academia is a bunch of people full of hot air who don’t do anything. Raising the min wage would raise prices on everything and just out more people out of work (I dared argue that one, got told I know nothing because of my age…month of my 28th birthday)

It’s not just fear, or loathing, add some resentment (not jealously, not resentment that “city folk” have it easier or something, but resentment that “city folk” don’t want their way of life…and that’s if you’re white, middle class, male, cis, straight, Christian, etc…anything else and they might just resent that you exist), then add a dash of “book learning doesn’t teach you anything you need to know”, stir in some “I don’t need your gadgets”, and then garish with some hatred seeped in “how dare you think you’re better than me?!”

And then decide that dealing with my father is better than dealing with that and stay here for the fourth. Oh well, the cat would get lonely if I went with them anyways. (Yes, the grapes must be sour)

Buttercup Q. Skullpants
Buttercup Q. Skullpants
7 years ago

It feels like the US is becoming more and more polarized and ungovernable. The right wing simply refuses to accept the legitimacy of the opposition. Any time Democrats attain the Presidency, the right wing embarks on witch hunts, conspiracy theories, taxpayer-$-wasting investigations, and impeachment proceedings. Even though the investigations inevitably fail to turn up anything, they still have the effect of distracting the Democrats, forcing them to expend their resources and energy defending themselves against baseless accusations and less time enacting a progressive agenda. Then, come election time, Republicans can portray Democrats as weak and ineffectual because they didn’t accomplish anything during their term in office. Rinse, repeat.

The refusal to acknowledge Democrats as legitimate also explains a lot of the birther conspiracy theories. If Obama can be exposed as a fake/alien/not born in the US, then he isn’t technically President, and America still hasn’t had a black President, and all is well in Stormfront land. It must really piss them off that Obama got elected to a second term.

brooked
7 years ago

The red states are built specifically on the white religious right. There are plenty of rural blue collar conservative-leaning people in New England, but that’s also the least religious region in the US. Now that the Republicans have gone nuclear right, New England, and the Mid-Atlantic states, are rock solid blue. In the North East, our stupid conservatives are less annoying or simply outnumbered. It’s not bragging if it’s true.

::off to listen to NPR and feel smug for no reason::

Flying Mouse
Flying Mouse
7 years ago

I often feel that the urban middle class democrats does not really get what makes the rural blue collar conservatives tick. Which is in part why right wing radio talk show hosts and televangelists have more influence on them then Howard Zinn, Bill Maher and Chomsky combined. There is a clash of values that goes deeper than fear and loathing, imo.

I agree, Isabelle. I live in one of the reddest areas of my Southern state, and since I blend in – nicely dressed middle class white lady with a wedding ring and two kids – a lot of strangers like to give me their “just between us chickens” insights on the world. I hear appalling racism, bigotry, prejudice…and a lot of confusion. Hateful things come out of their mouths, but under it all they mostly feel attacked. Older folks in particular have spent their entire lives being told that their beliefs are good and godly and patriotic, and now in the span of a few short decades things have changed completely. It’s easier and comforting to listen to people who’ll tell you that you’re still right and the change-makers are evil, so that’s what they do. And as despicable as their ideas and voting records are, I do feel for these angry, bewildered people. They can’t keep up with the changing world, and they probably never will.

I save my hatred for the pundits, politicians and plutocrats who exploit that insecurity and turn it into fear and self-righteous anger. Their profit and political gain comes at the price of real dialogue and understanding; because if we listen to each other, we might learn to agree, and there’s nothing lucrative about that. If the U.S. falls into complete in-fighting chaos, the blood will be on their hands.

pecunium
7 years ago

Argenti: this “new math” (wtf is with that one?)

It was an attempt to make math more understandable. It suffered from a number of flaws.

1: It introduced elements of Set Theory; but failed to properly structure this, so that one was grouping dissimilar things, and using pictorial elements instead of numerical ones, ergo five oranges, plus a bundle of 10 sticks and one apple = 16.

2: Because it wasn’t presenting math in terms the childrens parents were familiar with they didn’t understand it, and so couldn’t help their parents.

3: It required teachers who really understood the material, which wasn’t the case with many of them.

The thing is, when properly taught, it was better than the extant curricula, but it wasn’t often taught properly. Improperly taught it was massively confusing.

So it has been used as a whipping boy to prove that teachers can’t be trusted to teach.

mildlymagnificent
7 years ago

Raising the min wage would raise prices on everything and just out more people out of work (I dared argue that one, got told I know nothing because of my age…month of my 28th birthday)

Perhaps you could initiate a facebook meltdown if you circulated this article written by someone who …
1) favours raising the minimum wage
2) is a multi-billionaire
3) Is addressing these remarks to other multi-billionaires.

http://www.politico.com/magazine/story/2014/06/the-pitchforks-are-coming-for-us-plutocrats-108014.html#.U7S7f5SSw7m

It’s long, but I love a couple of portions. This one’s from page 3. (Note when he says “you” he’s talking to the other 0.01%ers.)

Wal-Mart is our nation’s largest employer with some 1.4 million employees in the United States and more than $25 billion in pre-tax profit. So why are Wal-Mart employees the largest group of Medicaid recipients in many states? Wal-Mart could, say, pay each of its 1 million lowest-paid workers an extra $10,000 per year, raise them all out of poverty and enable them to, of all things, afford to shop at Wal-Mart. Not only would this also save us all the expense of the food stamps, Medicaid and rent assistance that they currently require, but Wal-Mart would still earn more than $15 billion pre-tax per year. …

We rich people have been falsely persuaded by our schooling and the affirmation of society, and have convinced ourselves, that we are the main job creators. It’s simply not true. There can never be enough super-rich Americans to power a great economy. I earn about 1,000 times the median American annually, but I don’t buy thousands of times more stuff. My family purchased three cars over the past few years, not 3,000. I buy a few pairs of pants and a few shirts a year, just like most American men. I bought two pairs of the fancy wool pants I am wearing as I write, what my partner Mike calls my “manager pants.” I guess I could have bought 1,000 pairs. But why would I? Instead, I sock my extra money away in savings, where it doesn’t do the country much good.

… You know the truth even if you won’t admit it: If any of us had been born in Somalia or the Congo, all we’d be is some guy standing barefoot next to a dirt road selling fruit. It’s not that Somalia and Congo don’t have good entrepreneurs. It’s just that the best ones are selling their wares off crates by the side of the road because that’s all their customers can afford.

Isabelle
Isabelle
7 years ago

@Flying Mouse
I save my hatred for the pundits, politicians and plutocrats who exploit that insecurity and turn it into fear and self-righteous anger. Their profit and political gain comes at the price of real dialogue and understanding; because if we listen to each other, we might learn to agree, and there’s nothing lucrative about that.
^that
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